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New Research Identifies Lifestyle Factors Linked to Bone Loss in Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/100/1/New-Research-Identifies-Lifestyle-Factors-Linked-to-Bone-Loss-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 01/20/2001
 
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:1195-1199. Celiac.com 01/20/2001 - Italian researchers h

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:1195-1199.

Celiac.com 01/20/2001 - Italian researchers have identified several key factors that contribute to bone loss in adults with celiac disease, including the following:

  • Gender
  • Malnutrition
  • Disease Severity
  • Physical Activity

They also conclude that, contrary to current belief, age at diagnosis, sunlight exposure and smoking do not seem to be significant factors in bone mineral density. In their study, Dr. Gino Roberto Corazza (University of Pavia) and associates evaluated 39 adults with untreated celiac disease, including 18 who had symptoms and 21 who did not. The researchers used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density, and assessed the patients physical activity, cigarette smoking, nutritional status and exposure to sunlight.

The results of the study indicate that femoral and lumbar bone mineral density was lower in patients with symptoms than patients without, and women tended to have lower mineral bone density than men. This finding, in combination with other factors were associated with reduced bone mineral density in the femoral neck, lumbar spine or both. Further, the key factors seem to be the severity of the patients symptoms and their nutritional status, both of which had significant effects on both lumbar and femoral bone mineral density. The patients levels of physical activity affected only femoral bone mineral density, and the gender of the patient affected mainly the lumbar density.

This is one of the first studies of its kind, and Dr. Corazzas group stresses the need for follow-up studies to determine whether additional therapeutic measures such as moderate and on-going physical activity and a more rapid implementation of a gluten-free diet might be useful in increasing the bone mass gain in people with celiac disease.