Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Osteomalacia, Osteoporosis and Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/102/1/Osteomalacia-Osteoporosis-and-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
The following was taken from a lecture given by Dr. Joseph Murray in October, 1996. It was publ

The following was taken from a lecture given by Dr. Joseph Murray in October, 1996. It was published by the Sprue-Nik Press (Published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan) Volume 5, Number 9, December 1996. Dr. Joseph Murray, one of the leading USA physicians in the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Dr. Murray (murray.joseph@mayo.edu) of the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, is a gastroenterologist who specializes in treating Celiac disease:

Q: Can you touch on bone pain?

A: The most common cause of severe bone pain with untreated celiac disease is osteomalacia, which is malformation of the bones due to lack of Vitamin D and calcium. It affects mostly the hips, and sometimes the shoulders and back. It usually gets better with specific treatment, which includes the gluten-free diet for celiacs and sometimes includes Vitamin D supplementation and other interventions.

Another cause of bone pain is osteoporosis. It can often cause pain in the back, due to vertebrae which have become shortened and have begun squeezing the nerves. This condition is very painful and is not going to get better; once the vertebrae have shortened they are not going to stretch back up to their original size.

Muscle pain can also occur, due to Vitamin D deficiency. I have seen some leg pains as the initial presentation of celiac disease which cleared up with the gluten-free diet.