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Two Rapid Commercial Celiac Disease Test Kits Found to be Accurate
http://www.celiac.com/articles/1043/1/Two-Rapid-Commercial-Celiac-Disease-Test-Kits-Found-to-be-Accurate/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 08/14/2006
 
Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101(7):1597-1600. Celiac.com 08/14/2006 – In an effort to increase

Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101(7):1597-1600.

Celiac.com 08/14/2006 – In an effort to increase the diagnosis rate of celiac disease, researchers in Italy conducted a study to determine the accuracy of two of the new "at home" type rapid commercial celiac disease test kits--both of which require only one drop of whole blood to gain results. Both of the kits detect IgA-IgG anti-human-transglutaminase antibodies (anti-h-tTG) in serum and IgA anti-h-tTG antibody in a single drop of whole blood. The researchers analyzed the serum samples of 114 biopsy-confirmed celiacs, 120 healthy controls, 20 first-degree relatives of celiacs, and 75 diseased controls, and compared them to the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing method. Whole blood samples were taken in 51 of the biopsy-confirmed celiacs and 100 controls.

The serum-based test was found to be positive in all 114 celiac patients, or 100% sensitivity, and among the controls which included three with celiac disease there was 94.9% sensitivity. The accuracy of the blood drop-based assay testing was positive in 46 of the 51 celiacs tested, which equals 90.2% sensitivity. The accuracy, however, is actually higher because five of the patients who tested negative had total IgA deficiency, so the real sensitivity level is actually 95.8%. All 100 controls tested negative which equals 100% specificity.

Given the high degree of accuracy of the two commercial test kits that were evaluated the researchers conclude that general practitioners should utilize these low cost kits during standard office visits whenever celiac disease is suspected.