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Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease by Roy Jamron
http://www.celiac.com/articles/1062/1/Cognitive-Impairment-and-Celiac-Disease-by-Roy-Jamron/Page1.html
Roy Jamron
Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders. 
By Roy Jamron
Published on 10/12/2006
 
Celiac.com 10/12/2006 - A new study examined Mayo Clinic medical records for the years 1970 through

Celiac.com 10/12/2006 - A new study examined Mayo Clinic medical records for the years 1970 through 2005 to identify eight male and five female patients, aged 45-79, showing cognitive decline within two years of onset or a severe exacerbation of symptoms of biopsy-proven celiac disease. Patients presented with amnesia, acalculia, confusion, and personality changes, and most also had ataxia or peripheral neuropathy. 4 had folate, vitamin B12 and/or vitamin E deficiencies with no improvement upon supplementation. Three improved on a gluten-free diet. It was concluded "A possible association exists between progressive cognitive impairment and celiac disease."

Arch Neurol. Oct 2006;63:1440-1446
Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
William T. Hu, MD, PhD; Joseph A. Murray, MD; Melanie C. Greenaway, PhD;
Joseph E. Parisi, MD; Keith A. Josephs, MST, MD

This was a limited study. While it looked at folate and vitamins B12 and E, one major oversite of celiac disease research continues to be a dearth of knowledge about levels of essential fatty acids in celiac disease patients. Fat malabsorption is a primary symptom of celiac disease, and the consequences continue to be ignored. Meanwhile, an accumulation of evidence supports the critical role of omega-3 fatty acids in maintaining cognitive and mental health. Omega-3 supplementation has even reversed conditions such as schizophrenia in individuals, begging the question of whether it is gluten toxicity or a fatty acid deficiency that may cause schizophrenia in some celiacs.

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