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Enzyme and Sulfur Oxidization Deficiencies in Autistic Children with Known Food/Chemical Intolerance
http://www.celiac.com/articles/111/1/Enzyme-and-Sulfur-Oxidization-Deficiencies-in-Autistic-Children-with-Known-FoodChemical-Intolerance/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
The following was taken from AUTISM 95: The following was written about a study: to determi

The following was taken from AUTISM 95:

The following was written about a study: to determine whether children with autism and known food/chemical intolerance have a deficiency of phenol-sulphotransferase-P enzyme and/or a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. On the results obtained so far, all 18 children have a low enzyme level, and some have a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. This enzyme metabolizes phenols and amines. Therefore, with a reduced level, these children will be unable to fully metabolize foods and chemicals which contain phenols (and amines)...

...The majority of children in this category ... have allergy to or intolerance of many foods/chemicals, the main offenders being wheat, cows milk, and salicylates. Their family histories show asthma, eczema, migraines, hay fever, plus many other allergy-related conditions...Their siblings display learning difficulties, dyslexia, etc.....

In autism and other disorders we suspect a peptidase deficiency so that proteins are not broken down into individual amino acids and these short, biologically active chains (peptides) exist in appreciable quantities. Even in the normal gut there will be some of these substances but they are not normally a problem. If the gut wall is leaky (celiac disease or lack of sulfur transferase, etc) these compounds will get into the bloodstream. Even then there should be no serious problem unless they enter the blood...

...The brain is protected by the blood brain barrier (BBB) which is partly physical and partly chemical in nature. Thus this would keep peptides out unless there are huge quantities circulating.

So when the intestinal wall is not healthy and the brain is vulnerable, the brain is affected directly. Learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and even extremes such as schizophrenic behavior can result. The three things which happen are:

  • Not Enough Enzymes To Fully Digest Particular Protein Chains
  • A Breachable Intestinal Wall
  • A Vulnerable Brain