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Crohn's Disease: Bacterium Tied to Crohn's Disease to be Removed From Milk in the United Kingdom
http://www.celiac.com/articles/114/1/Crohns-Disease-Bacterium-Tied-to-Crohns-Disease-to-be-Removed-From-Milk-in-the-United-Kingdom/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 01/10/2001
 
Celiac.com 01/10/2001 - According to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) of the UK, British healt

Celiac.com 01/10/2001 - According to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) of the UK, British health experts are exploring ways to eliminate a bacterium that has been linked to Crohns disease from the food chain. As reported by Reuters Health, scientists have warned of a widespread bacterium called Mycobacterium paratuberculosis that is the likely cause of the bowel disorder. This bacterium can survive the milks normal, or even prolonged pasteurization process.

Crohns disease, like ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease with a number of symptoms, including severe abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea and loss of weight. The scientists do not believe, however, that ulcerative colitis is caused by Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

According to the FSA test results on UK samples, the bacterium is present in 1.9% of raw milk samples and 2.1% of pasteurized milk samples. According to the Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food, there is no direct scientific proof of a link between the bacterium and Crohns disease, but they nevertheless believe that there is evidence of a link.

The committee has not given any advice on the consumption of milk, but believe that people need to reduce their exposure to the bacterium, and they intent to convene a conference to review ideas to create controls at all stages of the food chain to prevent the bacterium from contaminating the milk. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is known to cause Johnes Disease in cud-chewing animals, so they will first look at ways to control this disease in animals, which will hopefully lead to a way to prevent it from entering the human food chain