Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Elimination Diet May Ease Fibromyalgia
http://www.celiac.com/articles/118/1/Elimination-Diet-May-Ease-Fibromyalgia/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 01/14/2002
 
Celiac.com 01/14/2002 - Researchers led by Dr. Joel S. Edman of the Center for Integrative M

Celiac.com 01/14/2002 - Researchers led by Dr. Joel S. Edman of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania recently conducted a small and preliminary study that suggests that people with fibromyalgia may experience reductions in their symptoms if they eliminate one or more foods from their diet. The results were presented in October 2001 at the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition in Orlando, Florida. In the study researchers reviewed the medical charts of 17 fibromyalgia patients who agreed to eliminate items such as corn, wheat, dairy, citrus, soy and nuts from their diets for at least two weeks. After the elimination of the foods, nearly half of the patients reported a significant reduction of pain, and 76% reported a reduction in other symptoms such as bloating, heartburn, headache, fatigue, and breathing difficulties. Two patients, however, reported an increase in symptoms.

After the two-week period the patients were re-introduced to the foods one at a time every 2-3 days, and many of their symptoms returned. The most common problem-causing foods for the patients in the study were corn, wheat, dairy, citrus and sugar. Dr. Edman emphasized that the findings of the study are preliminary and more research in this area needs to be done.