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Do Adults with High Gliadin Antibody Concentrations have Subclinical Gluten Intolerance?
http://www.celiac.com/articles/132/1/Do-Adults-with-High-Gliadin-Antibody-Concentrations-have-Subclinical-Gluten-Intolerance/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
Please note that this study has no biopsy confirmation, so it can only be called gluten int

Please note that this study has no biopsy confirmation, so it can only be called gluten intolerance statistics. Its findings indicate that gluten intolerance may be relatively common in the general population.

AU - Arnason JA ; Gudjonsson H ; Freysdottir J ; Jonsdottir I ; Valdimarsson H
TI - Do Adults with High Gliadin Antibody Concentrations have Subclinical Gluten Intolerance?
LA - Eng
AD - Department of Immunology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
SO - Gut 1992 Feb;33(2):194-7 AB - Gliadin antibodies of the IgG and IgA isotopes and IgG subclasses were measured in 200 adults who were randomly selected from the Icelandic National Register.

Those with the highest gliadin antibody concentrations were invited with negative controls to participate in a clinical evaluation. Neither the study subjects nor the physicians who recorded and evaluated the clinical findings were aware of the antibody levels. Significantly higher proportion of the gliadin antibody positive individuals reported unexplained attacks of diarrhea (p = 0.03), and IgA gliadin antibodies were associated with increased prevalence of chronic fatigue (p = 0.0037). The gliadin antibody positive group also showed significantly decreased transferrin saturation, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin compared with the gliadin antibody negative controls. Serum folic acid concentrations were significantly lower in the IgA gliadin antibody positive individuals. On blind global assessment, 15 of the 48 participants were thought to have clinical and laboratory features that are compatible with gluten sensitive enteropathy, and 14 of these were in the gliadin antibody positive group (p = 0.013). Complaints that have not been associated with gluten intolerance had similar prevalence in both groups with the exception of persistent or recurrent headaches that were more common in the gliadin antibody positive group. These findings raise the possibility that a sub-clinical form of gluten intolerance may be relatively common.

The following chart summarizes the study:

No. Randomly Selected for Study No. Selected w/ High Gliadin No. w/ Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy No. w/ GSE & High Gliadin
200 ( = 100%) 48 ( = 24%) 15 ( = 7.5%) 14 ( = 7%)