AU- Baudon JJ; Mougenot JF; Didry JR
CS- Unite de Gastroenterologie Pediatrique, Hopital Trousseau, Paris, France.
JN- J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr; 6 (2) p244-51
PY- Mar-Apr 1987

AB- The lymphoblastic stimulation test (LST) with cows milk proteins was performed in 114 infants. In 42 infants, digestive intolerance to cows milk proteins (CMI) was suspected; withdrawal/re-challenge test confirmed intolerance in 34, and disproved it in the other eight patients. Of the other patients, 17 had acute gastroenteritis, 11 had postgastroenteritis sub-acute diarrhea, 12 had gluten intolerance, 14 had intractable diarrhea, and 18 had no digestive disorders. Of the 34 infants with CMI, 27 (79%) had a positive LST to one or more cows milk proteins. Of the 34 positive LST patients, 12 also had Soya intolerance; nine of these 12 infants (75%) had positive LST to Soya. Of the eight infants who had a negative cows milk re-challenge test, five (62%) had a positive LST. In the other groups, results were also positive in 12-27% of those having diarrhea of infectious origin or gluten intolerance, and in none of the infants without digestive disorders. Of the 14 cases of severe intractable diarrhea, 12 (86%) were also LST-positive, but CMI could not be excluded. LST was positive, particularly in diarrhea of neonatal origin. Lymphoblastic stimulation was induced more frequently by casein than by beta lactoglobulin, and least frequently by alpha lactalbumin. In conclusion, LST is frequently positive in CMI, but is not sufficiently specific to be a reliable diagnostic examination.

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