Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Histological Studies of Small-Intestinal Biopsies from Infants with Low Rate of Weight Gain
http://www.celiac.com/articles/167/1/Histological-Studies-of-Small-Intestinal-Biopsies-from-Infants-with-Low-Rate-of-Weight-Gain/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
AU- Fallstrom SP; Kristiansson B; Ryd W JN- Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]; 89 (6) p431-8 PY

AU- Fallstrom SP; Kristiansson B; Ryd W
JN- Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]; 89 (6) p431-8
PY- Nov 1981

AB- Eighty-one children aged 4-18 months with unsatisfactory weight gain were investigated for organic diseases; the investigation included small-intestinal biopsy. Sixteen had total villous atrophy, in most cases due to gluten intolerance. Transient disease, e.g. cows milk protein intolerance, was probable in 7 children with subtotal atrophy. In 18 children the only abnormal finding was an increased number of inflammatory cells in the mucosa, a finding which was probably of no clinical significance. Planimetric measurement showed good agreement between the mucosal surface/volume ratio and an ordinary histological grouping of the mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the rate of weight gain during the period preceding investigation and mucosal surface/volume ratio.