Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Lisa Lewis on Autism, Casein and Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/169/1/Lisa-Lewis-on-Autism-Casein-and-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
Proteins consist of long chains of units known as amino acids. Normal proteins are digested by enz

Proteins consist of long chains of units known as amino acids. Normal proteins are digested by enzymes in the intestines and are broken down into these units. However, if for some reason this digestion is incomplete, short chains of these amino acids (known as peptides) will result. ....... The majority of these peptides will be dumped in the urine, (but) a small portion will cross into the brain and interfere with transmission in such a way that normal (brain) activity is altered or disrupted.....

(snip. The articles goes on to explain that these peptides are biologically active & somewhat similar to opioid peptides.)

It is well known that casein (from human or cows milk) will break down in the stomach to produce a peptide known as casomorphine, which, as the name implies, will have opioid activities. Similar effects are noted with gluten from wheat and some other cereals ...in which the compounds formed are gluteomorphins (or gliadinomorphins).

So some of us who are gluten sensitive are also casein sensitive, and a gluten ingestion will affect brain activity.