Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Oats Produce No Adverse Immunologic Effects in Patients With Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/202/1/Oats-Produce-No-Adverse-Immunologic-Effects-in-Patients-With-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 03/17/2000
 
Gut 2000;46:327-331. March 10, 2000 Celiac.com 03/17/2000 - Finish researchers report that

Gut 2000;46:327-331. March 10, 2000

Celiac.com 03/17/2000 - Finish researchers report that people with celiac disease who eat oats show no adverse autoantibody or intraepithelial lymphocyte level effects. According to Dr. M. I. J. Uusitupa (University of Kuopio), and colleagues: Wheat, rye, and barley have harmful effects on the small intestinal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease, whereas maize and rice are harmless...(H)owever, the place of oats in the coeliac diet has been debated. The researchers studied two groups: 40 adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease and 52 adults whose celiac disease was in remission. The people in both groups were randomized to either a conventional gluten-free diet, or a gluten-free diet that also included oats. Both groups were monitored for autoantibodies and intraepithelial lymphocytes over a 6- or 12-month period. In the patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease the disappearance rates of antireticulin antibodies, antigliadin antibodies, and intraepithelial lymphocytes were the same, regardless of their diet. Likewise the people with celiac disease that was in remission had similar antibody and intraepithelial lymphocyte levels between both dietary groups. According to the researchers: These results strengthen the view that adult patients with coeliac disease can consume moderate amounts of oats without adverse immunological effects. The researchers also note that: more clinical studies are needed to ensure the safety of oats when consumed permanently in a coeliac diet as well as to determine the effect of larger amounts of oats.