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Oats Safe for Children with Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/203/1/Oats-Safe-for-Children-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 10/10/2000
 
J Pediatr 2000;137:356-366 Celiac.com 10/10/2000 - Dr. Hoffenberg and colleagues from the Univer

J Pediatr 2000;137:356-366

Celiac.com 10/10/2000 - Dr. Hoffenberg and colleagues from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver report that the short-term consumption of commercially available oat cereal is safe for children with celiac disease new to a gluten-free diet. To determine this they studied 10 children with celiac disease who consumed 24 g of oat cereal per day, and examined small bowel histomorphology and antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer at baseline and at 6 months. According to Dr. Hoffenberg: Compared with start of study, at completion there was a significant decrease in biopsy score, intraepithelial count, antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer and number of symptoms.

They reported the gluten content of several substances:

Study oatmeal (%, range) average of 4 samples 0.009 (0.003-0.014)
Irish Oatmeal 0.006 %
Quaker oatmeal 0.006 %
Safeway oatmeal 0.005 %
Jane Lee oatmeal 0.026 %
Soy flour 0.001 %
Brown rice flour 0.000 %
Pancake mix 0.000 %
Cornmeal 0.000 %
Rice flour 0.000 %

Test was done with RIDASCREEN ELISA test for omega-gliadins. It detects wheat/barley/rye high molecular weight proteins but not oat avenin. The grain scientists tell us that even though oat proteins are different, they do have similar amino acid sequences to the toxic gliadin sequences. Similarly, in vitro (test tube) studies do show that oat proteins trigger the immune response of cells taken from celiac patients.

The team emphasized, however, that the long-term effects of oat cereal added to a gluten-free diet in children with celiac disease still need to be determined.