Celiac.com 10/12/2007 - The presence of gluten serves to activate HLA-DQ2/DQ8-restricted intestinal specific T-cells. Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. A team of Italian researchers recently conducted a study to determine whether a new enzyme strategy might offer promise in abolishing adverse gluten-associated activity.

The team used mass spectrometry to analyze enzyme modifications of immuno-dominant a-gliadin peptide P56-58 and modeling studies to determine the extent of peptide binding to HLA-DQ2.The team treated wheat flour with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methylesther. They then extracted, digested and deaminated the gliadin.

They used biopsy specimens from 12 adults with known celiac disease to generate gliadin-specific intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs), which they then challenged in vitro with various antigen solutions.

The results showed that tissue TG-mediated transamidation with lysine methylesther of P56-58, or gliadin in alkaline conditions inhibited the interferon expression in iTCLs.

Gastroenterology, Volume 133, Issue 3, September 2007; p780-789

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