Celiac.com 11/29/2007 - Studies have documented the role of gut microbiotic bacteria in diseases involving chronic inflammation, such as celiac disease, yet there is scant data on such bacteria that is specific to people with celiac disease. A team of Spanish and Italian researchers from three different hospitals and universities made up of Yolanda Sanz, Ester Sanchez, Marta Marzotto, Miguel Calabuig, Sandra Torriani, and Franco Dellaglio set out to determine what differences might exist between the microbiotic bacteria in the guts of children with celiac disease compared to a healthy control group of their peers.

The team conducted a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of fecal samples from both the celiac and the control groups. They found that children with celiac disease had a more diverse profile of intestinal microbiotic bacteria than did the healthy control subjects.

The children with celiac disease were characterized by the presence of Lactobacillus curvatus, Leuconostoc mesenteriodes, and Leuconostoc carnosum, whereas the members of the healthy control group were characterized by the presence of Lactobacillus casei. Conversely, the bifidobacterium population was much greater in the members of the healthy control group than among the children with celiac disease.

The healthy control group showed particularly high populations of bifidobacterium adolescentis compared to the celiac patients. The team has called for more research into which populations of the various gut microbial are affected by celiac disease. This may lead to a possible role for probiotics and/or prebiotics in returning the balance of the gut microbes in those with celiac disease.

FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2007 Dec;51(3):562-8

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