Celiac.com 12/03/2007 - Along with the increasing rate of celiac disease diagnosis comes a corresponding increase in the need for safe, inexpensive, and appetizing gluten-free foods. Sorghum is inexpensive to grow, has a neutral flavor, and has been assumed to be gluten-free due to its close relationship with maize. Sorghum has been consumed in many parts of the world in foods and beverages such as flat breads, porridge, and beer. However, in the United States, the country that grows most of the world’s sorghum, it is used primarily as animal feed.

Researchers tested the safety of sorghum in duodenal biopsies (tissue samples from the small intestine) from 8 celiac patients and 4 patients with other gastrointestinal disorders (i.e., not celiac disease). Biopsies treated with sorghum protein digests showed no increase in proteins involved in the immune response to gluten. By comparison, biopsies of celiac patients treated with