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Durum Wheat Peptide Could Lead To Celiac Disease Treatment

Celiac.com 02/10/2008 - Researchers have found a 10mer durum wheat peptide capable of shifting a Th1 gluten-intolerant T cell response to a Th2 gluten-tolerant T cell response in intestinal T cell cultures derived from celiac disease children and incubated with deamidated gliadin peptides.  Durum wheat peptides could potentially treat celiac disease by causing celiac disease associated T cells to react tolerantly to gluten.

In the study, incubation of the T cell cultures with deamidated gliadin peptides resulted in a significant increase in T cell proliferation and interferon-gamma release.  Simultaneous exposure to duram wheat peptides totally abolished the cell proliferation and cytokine release while maintaining an elevated release of interleukin-10 (IL-10).

The workings of the immune system are too complex to discuss here in detail.  Basically when a "pre-helper" CD4-type T cell is presented with an epitope from an antigen (gliadin), the T cell becomes activated and responds to the stimulus by becoming either a type 1 or type 2 helper T cell which in turn releases different subsets of cytokines.  The Th1 path promotes mucosal tissue destruction in celiac disease while the Th2 path initiates proliferation of gluten and tTGase antibodies.  Th1 and Th2 cytokines each have properties which act in a feedback loop to suppress, limit, and regulate each other's cytokine secretions, i.e. Th1 cytokines suppress Th2 cytokine secretion and vice vesa.

Overactivity of either a Th1 or a Th2 response can result in an autoimmune condition.  Researchers theorize that balancing Th1/Th2 response can ameliorate and control symptoms and disease progression in at least some autoimmune diseases.  Th1 response includes release of the cytokine interferon-gamma which differentiates and activates macrophages.  Th2 response can include the release of IL-10, a cytokine which suppresses inflammation and promotes antigen tolerance.  Various molecules have been demonstrated to shift Th1/Th2 response in various autoimmune disorders.  In the durum wheat study, the presence of the durum wheat peptide in the gliadin peptide incubated celiac intestinal T cell culture increased Th2 IL-10 release and stopped T cell proliferation and Th1 interferon-gamma release.  Hence, this durum wheat peptide may be useful as a celiac disease therapy.  How effective this treatment may be is unknown at this time. 

Below is an example of sodium benzoate being used to shift Th1 to Th2 response in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis which improved symptoms and disease progression when fed to the mice orally.  This suggests that the durum wheat peptide could potentially treat celiac disease by simply being administered as an oral supplement.  However, if a probiotic bacteria could be genetically engineered to continuously secrete a form of this durum wheat peptide in the gut, this could result in essentially a "cure" for celiac disease if the durum wheat peptide proves effective.

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Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Feb;87(2):415-23.
A 10-residue peptide from durum wheat promotes a shift from a Th1-type response toward a Th2-type response in celiac disease.
Silano M, Di Benedetto R, Maialetti F, De Vincenzi A, Calcaterra R, Trecca A, De Vincenzi M.
Division of Food Science, Human Nutrition and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy.
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/2/415

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J Immunol. 2007 Jul 1;179(1):275-83.
Sodium benzoate, a food additive and a metabolite of cinnamon, modifies T cells at multiple steps and inhibits adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.
Brahmachari S, Pahan K.
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, 1735 West Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.
http://www.jimmunol.org/cgi/content/abstract/179/1/275

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20 Responses:

 
Carla Omoruyi
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Feb 2008 9:22:58 AM PST
As a gluten intolerant person, I would be very interested in taking some kind of supplement that would enable me to digest gluten with no side effects. Please continue the research and keep posting the results. Thanks

 
Lin
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said this on
12 Feb 2008 11:17:33 AM PST
This is so much more exciting news than the 'pill' for eating out, a real treatment that alters the response of our bodies to gluten! WOW!

 
Ro Nocera
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said this on
12 Feb 2008 12:09:10 PM PST
The end of the article gave me hope, because he said this cure lead to a cure. I am afraid the article was extremely technical and I didn't understand very much.

 
Roberta
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said this on
12 Feb 2008 1:56:38 PM PST
This article is encouraging in concept, but a little too esoteric for the average lay person (like me!) to understand. I'm just glad that research is showing promise for a cure, or at least a helping hand. Even though Celiac disease is completely manageable by the proper diet, it's very limiting. Anything that can give us back some spontaneity would be greatly appreciated!

 
Betty
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said this on
12 Feb 2008 5:19:13 PM PST
Why go through all that. I have Celiac Sprue and I eat all kinds of fruits and vegetables. I do make my own gluten free bread which is just as easy as making bread that is made wheat. Or buy gluten free bread at the health food store. So don't feel sorry for yourself. You can live a long and healthy live without gluten.

 
Jan
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said this on
13 Feb 2008 6:41:49 AM PST
Keep up the great research! I look forward to the day that I can absorb nutrients normally and not have issues with iron, vitamins and gluten. Thank you from all the Celiacs who are waiting for some help!

 
Diane
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said this on
14 Feb 2008 5:04:09 PM PST
Yes! Keep up the research. Even though we can cook, bake, and eat unprocessed foods and be gluten-free healthy....... it would still be nice to be able to be spontaneous every once in a while and go out to eat without a big ordeal of explaining to the chef/waiter/waitress, etc.

 
Tammy
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said this on
15 Feb 2008 5:49:12 AM PST
Great information, keep pushing for a treatment! I love all of the positive comments. It won't stop me from eating all kinds of fruits and vegetables, (why would it?) but it would be nice not to have the expense of buying gluten free products. I don't feel sorry for myself, I can live a long and healthy live with gluten. It would free up a lot of my time spent cooking and baking as I have a life.

 
Tom Beebe
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said this on
16 Feb 2008 12:38:23 PM PST
It's always valuable as a celiac person to learn the newest information that makes our life with this condition a little easier and a little safer. Yes, we can learn to live without gluten, but what a joy it would be to now be free of the constant diligence one must have to stay well. Thanks you.

 
Janet
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said this on
17 Feb 2008 7:38:05 PM PST
I think this is great news for Celiacs! I hope they continue to research and study cures for Celiac!

 
Robin
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said this on
18 Feb 2008 3:48:42 AM PST
What a hope we could all have about this pill. As a recent celiac I am still trying to adjust, this gives me hope that someday I can cheat a little.

 
Linda
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said this on
18 Feb 2008 7:27:07 AM PST
This was wonderful news that there might be a pill or something we can take...I would love to eat some of the things I have been without. I know that we can purchase things at a specialty store but the prices are unreal. Thank you again, keep up the good work.

 
Ruby
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said this on
19 Feb 2008 2:09:51 PM PST
My husband is the victim of Celiac Disease, and I wish more than anything that very soon there will be a cure or at least medication to keep it under control. He is skin on bones now, and I worry about his systems shutting down. Diet helps, but it has never restored his condition. It's not pity, just worry over the fact I could lose my love. Please continue with this vital research. Thank you!

 
Hayat Yazidi
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said this on
23 Feb 2008 12:14:28 PM PST
Excellent! Keep up the research please as we all are hoping for any kind of treatment or cure that could help. The worst is that I live in a country where this disease is still not so well known, so forget about gluten free stuff in stores...

 
Mike
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said this on
04 Mar 2008 9:07:19 AM PST
Too technical for my feeble mind to completely understand. The great message is there is ongoing research that is so encouraging. I am fine with being able to manage my disease at home and in the office, but, my job requires frequent meetings which are organized around restaurant meals. Being able to order from the menu at ANY restaurant, once in a while, is something which I would greatly appreciate. Thanks for the research.

 
Jaymea
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said this on
10 Apr 2008 9:45:53 AM PST
Great! 'Cause I want pizza, I want donuts, I wanna Big Mac too........but for now I'm eatin' oats, rice, popcorn, veggies, and meat, and I need some vitamin K because my blood's a little drippy.

 
Rach
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said this on
18 Apr 2008 12:26:59 PM PST
YAY! This is so exciting. I definitely have learned how to eat healthier and read labels (being a fitness freak anyway it's important) etc, since being diagnosed just last year after 14 years of agony and confusion.
But to be able to treat myself just every now and then to a big old greasy slice of pepperoni pizza and an Aussie beer, would be marvelous!
One in 100 people have the disease... so surprised it hasn't happened sooner!
Even non-celiacs will benefit from the research.

Keep up the fantastic work! We really appreciate what you are doing for us!

 
monica
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said this on
08 Sep 2008 8:11:19 PM PST
This is very exciting research, but I also read that sodium benzoate can be carcinogenic, and lead to ADHD in children.

 
Yalcin
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said this on
29 Nov 2008 6:19:39 PM PST
So wait a moment. We are going to take medicine which will increase Th2 and decrease TH1? I don't think this is how celiac disease should be treated. Wouldn't increasing TH2 and decreasing TH1 result in allergies?

 
Lori Greenan
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said this on
21 Apr 2014 11:20:56 AM PST
Wonderful news! I unknowingly consumed wheat durum in a rice dish and did not react. I Googled, read this article, and now I know why! A less technical version would be nice for those who are not as science-minded as others may be. KEEP POSTING ON THIS RESEARCH ABOUT A POTENTIAL CURE!




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