Celiac.com 05/18/2009 - People with clinical irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) suffer from biopsy-proven celiac disease at rates that are more than four times higher than in non-IBS control subjects, according to the results of a recent systematic review and meta-analysis conducted by Alexander C. Ford, MBChB, MD, MRCP, from Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues.

Prior studies have indicated that people with IBS had higher rates of celiac disease, but evidence has not been clear, and medical guidelines do not always call for celiac screening in these individuals.

To determine rates of celiac disease in random adults meeting clinical criteria for IBS, the research team reviewed MEDLINE from 1950 to May 31, 2008, and EMBASE from 1980 to May 31, 2008. They isolated case series and case-control studies that contained data for celiac disease blood screens. They found 14 such studies.

From each study, they isolated and aggregated positive serologic test results for celiac disease and biopsy-proved celiac disease. They then compared the data to that for patients with IBS and control individuals, using an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI).

The team isolated 4204 suitable cases from the identified studies. Of those, 2278 met clinical criteria for IBS (54%). The overall rate of positive