Celiac.com 07/01/2009 - Immunity to food allergens such as gliadin, or the proteins in cow's milk is central to prevention of certain diseases via an appropriate restriction diet. Detecting heightened levels immune reactions to antigen(s) in food is important because scientists have credible reports of certain health disturbances, such as celiac disease, and some pre-malignant conditions, such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), disappearing under a regimen of appropriate food restriction diets.

Only a small number of genetically predisposed individuals show a toxic  small bowel mucosa reaction to gliadin. Since levels of immunogenic gliadin may vary between different wheat species, a team of researchers first set out to assess immunogenic gliadin levels in ten bread wheat types and in three strains of commercially grown durum wheat.

The team was made up of Aleksandra Konic-Ristic, Dejan Dodig, Radmilo Krstic, Svetislav Jelic, Ivan Stankovic, Aleksandra Ninkovic, Jelena Radic, Irina Besu, Branka Bonaci-Nikolic, Njegica Jojic, Milica Djordjevic, Dragan Popovic, and Zorica Juranic.

They were spurred by previous studies that showed sera of some of multiple myeloma (MM) patients with elevated levels of anti-gliadin IgA, without enhanced levels of anti-gliadin IgG