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Peptic–tryptic Digest of Gliadin Differentiates Human Monocytes into Dendritic Cells Independently of the Presence of Celiac Disease and Genetic Make-up

A team of researchers with the Department of Medicine at the University Erlangen-Nuernberg in Germany recently set out to examine the role of the innate immune system in celiac disease. The team included Maryam Rakhimova, Birgit Esslinger, Anja Schulze-Krebs, Eckhart G. Hahn, Detlef Schuppan and Walburga Dieterich.

The researchers matured dendritic cells taken from venous blood of patients with both active and with treated celiac disease, along with DQ2–DQ8-positive or negative control subjects.  They treated the dendritic cells with a peptic–tryptic digest of gliadin (500 μg/ml)
and assessed activation by means of fluorescent-activated cell sorting analysis, cytokine secretion, and the cells' ability to trigger T cell proliferation.

The team noted that gliadin up-regulated interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-12 (p40) secretion in dendritic cells and triggered clear expression of the maturation markers human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, CD25, CD83, and CD86 in all test subjects, without regard to their genotype or the presence of disease; whereas the digest of bovine serum albumin had no effect.

However, gliadin-stimulated dendritic cells from patients with active celiac disease showed greater stimulation of autologous T cells compared to the other groups. The team concluded that further research should be aimed at identifying the mechanisms that control inflammation in healthy individuals.

Source:
J Clin Immunol, Volume 29, Number 1, January, 2009

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4 Responses:

 
Al Mahler
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
11 Jan 2010 6:45:15 AM PST
Fascinating article. Can anyone explain to me, what the heck this means? I find it deplorable when scientific articles are being offered without telling at the end: By the way, this is what it means for you.

 
wyckoffbr
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said this on
11 Jan 2010 7:18:30 AM PST
What did it say in layman's terms? Something about wanting a mechanism to control the inflammation that normal people have? Hmm. Please do a better job of paraphrasing.

Rating? What am I rating? How much I liked the article? How well Adams reported on the article? How relevant the article is to me?

 
Gloria Brown
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said this on
11 Jan 2010 10:25:11 AM PST
Important research, thank you!

 
Nora
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said this on
12 Jan 2010 7:57:28 AM PST
What this means?
It explains why patients on the gluten free diet can experience lots of symptoms from just a little gluten.
It has to do with these freshly activated T cells.
Google freshly activated T cells and there should be some celiac articles.
Well, there are several research projects going on in several countries and they try to find out if this is useful for diagnostics.
The method is that one just needs to be gluten free for at least one week, and then they take blood, and then the subject has to eat bread for three days, and then another blood test to look for freshly activated T cells.
Only celiacs will have these.
It would not work on anyone who still consumes gluten.




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