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Encouraging New Celiac Disease Drug
http://www.celiac.com/articles/22050/1/Encouraging-New-Celiac-Disease-Drug/Page1.html
Destiny Stone

I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

 
By Destiny Stone
Published on 03/12/2010
 
According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease. Characterized by small intestinal inflammation, intestinal injury and intolerance to gluten, celiac is  a genetic T-cell mediated auto-immune disease. Those diagnosed with celiac disease know that the only cure is an entirely gluten-free diet for life.

Celiac.com 03/12/2010 - According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease. Characterized by small intestinal inflammation, intestinal injury and intolerance to gluten, celiac is  a genetic T-cell mediated auto-immune disease. Those diagnosed with celiac disease know that the only cure is an entirely gluten-free diet for life.  When left untreated, celiac can manifest into life-threatening illnesses such as, heart disease, osteoporosis, and cancer. However, modern science is now presenting us with an alternative to suffering needlessly, and it comes in the shape of a little non-assuming pill called Larazotide Acetate.

While celiac disease affects 1 in 133 people, those numbers do not take into account the thousands of other people who are impacted from gluten intolerance and gluten related allergies. Gluten comes in many disguises but can be found primarily in wheat, rye, and barley. Since the Food and Drug Administration has not yet mandated gluten disclosures on labels, many foods are contaminated with hidden gluten. People that suffer from the inability to digest gluten are extremely limited when it comes to dining, and often find themselves eating alone or bringing their own gluten-free food to social events.

Eating a microscopic amount of gluten, for many gluten sensitive sufferers,  frequently leads to varying degrees of sicknesses including, diarrhea, vomiting, rashes, and insomnia. Some people are more sensitive than others, and those most sensitive to gluten cannot eat at many restaurants due to the chance of cross contamination. Much like a peanut allergy, those gluten sensitive can  get sick from eating gluten-free food that was cooked in the same kitchen as gluten food by means of contamination, or simply from receiving a kiss from a loved one that has traces of gluten on their mouth.

With so many unsavory reactions to food, the medical community has been attempting to devise a drug for celiacs that allows them to safely digest gluten. A new drug called Larazotide Acetate, has been called 'revolutionary' to the celiac and gluten sensitive community, and may be what celiacs need to live a more normal life. While it is not a cure, Larazotide Acetate has been proven in clinical trials to greatly reduce the negative reactions celiacs have with gluten. Clinical test patients displayed a decrease  in  intestinal damage, from 50% to 15%, when ingesting gluten after taking Larazotide Acetate.

Larazotide Acetate may very well be the new breakthrough drug of the decade. It offers celiacs and others with gluten sensitivities, the freedom to eat out at restaurants, or go to a friends house for dinner without the physiological and emotional stress that can accrue from worrying about, and getting sick from gluten contaminated food.

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