Celiac.com 04/12/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to look at connections between psoriasis, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract.

The team was made up of Paolo Gisondi, Micol Del Giglio, Alessandra Cozzi & Giampiero Girolomoni. They are associated with the Section of Dermatology and Venereology of the Department of Medicine, at the University of Verona, Italy.

Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease that is often tied to other disorders, including psoriatic arthropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardio-metabolic disorders.

Additionally, about 50% of all patients patients with psoriasis suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, from 0.2–4.3% suffer from celiac disease, and about one half of one percent suffer from Crohn's disease.

These associated conditions may have some common genetic traits, as well as common inflammatory pathways, and their presence offers important implications in the global approach to treating psoriasis.

In particular, common systemic antipsoriatic drugs might have a negative affect on associated cardio-metabolic conditions and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used to treat psoriasis.

Moreover, the team emphasizes the importance of encouraging psoriasis patients to drastically improve their modifiable cardiovascular and liver risk factors, especially obesity, alcohol and smoking intake, because improvements could have positive impact on both the psoriasis and the patient's general well-being.

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