Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Irritable Bowel Syndrome Could Be Tied to Gluten Issues
http://www.celiac.com/articles/22144/1/Irritable-Bowel-Syndrome-Could-Be-Tied-to-Gluten-Issues/Page1.html
Tina Turbin
Tina Turbin www.GlutenFreeHelp.info became extremely interested and involved in the subjects of celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten issues a number of years ago, after being diagnosed as celiac after many years of unresolved troubles. Since then, she has engaged in diligent research and writing about these topics, many weekly radio guest spots, developing gluten-free recipes and reviewing companies for celiac consumer safety, and writes monthly for NFCA's Newsletter (www.celiaccentral.org). Tina is an award-winning children's book author and donates her current children's audio book profits to Dr. Peter Green’s Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center. To stay updated on her projects and activities and to sign up for her newsletter, visit www.TinaTurbin.com. Tina resides in both her East and West Coast studios and kitchens continuing her writing, promoting and working within the celiac and gluten-free arena, and always writing more children's books to entertain the world.
 
By Tina Turbin
Published on 05/28/2010
 
Tina Turbin describes the recent research indicating an association between irritable bowel syndrome and celiac disease. She describes celiac disease and gluten intolerance and the treatment, a gluten-free diet. She also sets down some of the benefits of increased celiac awareness and support for the gluten-free community.

Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease.

New research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that people with IBS are four times more likely to have celiac disease than those without IBS. Doctors, often uneducated about celiac disease or improperly taught that its symptoms are dramatic, don’t associate the common symptoms of IBS, stomachaches, bloating, fatigue, and diarrhea, with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

In the January 2009 issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, the American College of Gastroenterology began recommending that doctors screen patients who manifest symptoms of IBS for celiac disease as well. The diagnosis is easy to test for. Simple blood tests detect the disease over ninety percent of the time. The diagnosis is then confirmed by an upper endoscopy. A small, flexible tube is slipped into the mouth of the sedated patient, down his esophagus and stomach and into the first part of the small intestine, where biopsies are taken and then examined for changes seen in celiac disease.

After a correct diagnosis is made, people with IBS who are also celiac can begin the rapid road to recovery with a gluten-free diet. As people become more aware of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, gluten-free foods and gluten-free cooking become more and more available. There are now many delicious gluten-free recipes available for favorite foods and desserts such as gluten-free pizza, gluten-free muffins, and gluten-free cupcakes. Adults and children alike who are gluten intolerant can still enjoy a gluten-free balanced diet with a variety of gluten-free choices.

In the U.S., a slightly increased rate of celiac diagnosis among adults has already lead to increased support. Gluten-free foods and gluten-free recipes are more readily available than ever. The Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness Program (GFRAP) assists in the mutually beneficial relationship between people diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance and restaurants, resulting in an increase in the number of restaurants which can provide service to people following a gluten-free diet while increasing their patronage. Participating restaurants are able to provide gluten-free meals. As more and more people are diagnosed with gluten intolerance, their list of participating restaurants will surely grow.

However, the U.S. remains behind in celiac awareness. This probably has something to do with the fact that celiac disease is the only autoimmune disease that the government doesn’t support with research grants. Centers such as Dr. Green’s Celiac Disease Research Center are one-hundred percent dependent on charitable donations or university funds. Even though diagnosis is slightly up for celiac adults, this isn’t enough to raise awareness and bring relief for the three million people who suffer from celiac disease, nearly ninety-seven percent of whom don’t even know the cause of their painful symptoms. With increased diagnosis, we will surely see increased support, and soon the celiac community will be able to enjoy the same quality of life and food and cooking options which is enjoyed by, for instance, the lactose-intolerant community.
 
If you have been diagnosed with IBS or have similar symptoms, make an appointment with your doctor today to get tested for celiac disease or gluten intolerance. It may just bring you the relief you’ve been looking for all these years.