Blood tests miss in some symptomatic kids.
Celiac.com 06/29/2010 - Properly diagnosing children with celiac disease in conditions where there may be environmental or other causes for classic celiac-associated symptoms, such as malnutrition, diarrhea, and failure to thrive, can present challenges to clinicians.

A clinical team conducted an assessment of celiac disease blood screens in symptomatic 12 to 36 month-old children. The research team included Inês Cristina Modelli; Lenora Gandolfi; Rodrigo Coutinho de Almeida; Gloria Maria A. C. Araújo; Marilúcia de Almeida Picanço; and Riccardo Pratesi.

They are associated with the Graduate Program in Health Sciences at the University of Brasilia School of Health Sciences, the Pediatric Department at the Brasilia University Hospital, and the Pediatric Research Center and Celiac Disease Investigation Center at the University of Brasilia School of Medicine in Brazil.

The clinicians wanted to assess rates of celiac disease in a group of 12 to 36 month-old children using immunoglobulin antibodies against gliadin (IgG and IgA-AGA), against endomysium (IgA-EMA), and anti-human tissue transglutaminase (IgA-tTG) screens.

For the study, the team enrolled 114 boys and 100 girls, aged 12 to 36 months, all following a gluten-containing diet. The team performed IgG and IgA-AGA, IgA-tTG and IgA-EMA blood tests for each patient. The team took biopsies from all children who showed one or more positive blood test, except those for whom IgG-AGA was the only positive result.

In cases where IgG-AGA was the only positive result, the team used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)