Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
How Much Vitamin D Should Infants Get to Possibly Prevent Celiac Disease?
http://www.celiac.com/articles/22184/1/How-Much-Vitamin-D-Should-Infants-Get-to-Possibly-Prevent-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Roy Jamron
Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders. 
By Roy Jamron
Published on 06/24/2010
 
A new limited study concludes all children under 5 years of age should probably receive at least 1000 IU of vitamin D daily as opposed to the current American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation of only 400 IU vitamin D daily.

Celiac.com 06/24/2010 - I have previously suggested vitamin D deficiency and the makeup of gut bacteria during pregnancy and infancy, while breast-feeding and prior to and during the introduction of gluten, may be factors leading to the onset of celiac disease. The question of how much vitamin D should be given to infants remains open. The current recommendation, by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is that children of all ages should receive 400 IU of vitamin D each day. A recent limited study of 74 diabetic children, however, suggests that this recommended dose may still be insufficient for most children. The children were given daily vitamin D doses ranging from 400 IU to 2000 IU over a 12-month period and their vitamin D status was monitored. Most of the children remained vitamin D insufficient or deficient at the end of the study. The study concluded that all children younger than 5 years should probably receive at least 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Further study is needed, especially with specific emphasis on the onset and prevention of celiac disease during infancy.


Source:
Medscape Medical News - June 22, 2010: More Evidence That Current Pediatric Vitamin D Recommendation is Often Inadequate
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723993