Subscribe to Journal of Gluten Sensitivity for more articles like this one.
This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2010 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.

Celiac.com 05/09/2011 - Living with celiac disease and diabetes can be a challenge, but it is not impossible.  You can travel the world, eat out and enjoy life but assertiveness is important to maintaining good blood glucose management and digestive health.

Individuals with diabetes may notice an elevation of their blood glucose after overeating gluten-containing foods at a party, sleep-over, or birthday celebration.  The usual rationalization is that too many calories and/or carbohydrates were consumed.  However, it may be a wake-up call for you to try and control blood glucose levels by reducing or excluding gluten-containing foods.

When eliminating wheat is first proposed as an alternative for controlling blood glucose, a frequent response is to express how “nutritious” wheat is.  As the nutritional comparison of flours in my book Living Gluten-Free (Charles C.  Thomas, Publisher, 2008)  illustrates, rice flour is comparable to wheat flour, and superior in Vitamin B6, Pantethenic Acid, Zinc, Copper, Manganese and many other vitamins and minerals.

Gluten sensitivity may affect as many as 1 in 25 Americans.  It is also becoming better recognized as a primary cause of inflammation.  Celiac disease or gluten intolerance can masquerade as many other diseases, including diabetes.  Many people given steroid medications for bowel inflammation can also develop diabetes as a side-effect of the steroid medication.

Once a gluten-free diet has been started, it is not necessary to “go back on wheat” to get a diagnosis of celiac disease.  A simple blood test can reveal whether one has the predisposing genes for gluten enteropathy, and therefore whether it is a cause of blood glucose problems.  Far too many people are told by gastroenterologists that a small intestinal