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Domino's Pizza Now Offers "Almost" Gluten-Free Pizza (So Be Careful!)

I have a big issue with what I believe to be a misleading headline in a recent joint press release by Domino's Pizza and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA)...here is the headline:

"Domino’s Pizza Becomes First National Pizza Delivery Chain to Offer Gluten Free Crust"

Photo: CC--janetmckWhen you read the release further, starting at the 5th paragraph, which many people will never get to, it says:

"While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten."

So my question is this: How can the NFCA, a national organization dedicated to supporting celiacs, actually get behind this? Domino's is obviously a big corporation that has decided it wants to cash in and profit on the new gluten-free gold rush, but they cleary don't want to spend the money that it would take to make their pizzas truely gluten-free, and safe for celiacs.

The Designations area of the NFCA's web site begins with: "Restaurants that complete GREAT Kitchens earn a designation based on their ability to meet gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten."  Just below this it describes their "Green Designation" and its "Amber Designation," and describes its Amber Designation as follows: "This level requires ingredient verification and basic training of wait staff and managers. Kitchen practices may vary with this designation, level one of the tier system, meaning those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity should ask questions and exercise judgment when dining at an establishment with an Amber Designation. Domino's has earned this designation."  So how has Domino's met "gluten-free needs and avoid cross-contamination with gluten"?

Also, I think any celiac who watches the video Domino's made for this release will find it a bit scary...the same ovens, pizza scoopers, topping areas, etc., as where they make their regular gluten pizzas.

I would exclude Domino's as an advertiser on Celiac.com based on this release.

Some might think that the NFCA has sold out here. I invite them to respond using the comment field below, and I invite you to respond.



Here is the original press release:

ANN ARBOR, Mich., May 7, 2012 – Domino's Pizza is responding to the needs of choice consumers, today launching a Gluten Free Crust available in all of its nearly 5,000 U.S. stores and becoming the first national pizza delivery chain to offer such a product.

Domino’s Pizza (NYSE: DPZ) consulted with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) to ensure its products and team member training meet the standards of the foundation’s GREAT Kitchens Amber Designation. NFCA’s GREAT Kitchens is an official credentialing program that has expanded to include restaurants offering gluten free products with varying kitchen practices, therefore suitable for those with gluten sensitivity under the Amber Designation.

Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust provides a great-tasting option for consumers who previously could not enjoy pizza from the recognized world leader in pizza delivery because of sensitivity to gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

“Many of our customers have asked for a gluten free crust, and Domino’s is excited to offer a product to customers with mild gluten sensitivity – as well as partner with the NFCA, which has been instrumental to our learning more about how to take this step,” said J. Patrick Doyle, Domino’s Pizza president and CEO. “The prevalence of gluten sensitivity has become a real issue with significant impact on consumer choice, and we want to be a part of the solution. Now, the whole group can enjoy Domino’s with the addition of our new Gluten Free Crust.”

While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten.

“The NFCA is thrilled that Domino’s Pizza has developed a product that will improve the quality of life for many of the estimated 18 million Americans who are gluten sensitive,” said Alice Bast, NFCA founder and president. “Not only is Domino’s Gluten Free Crust a huge win for much of the gluten free community who can now get pizza delivered to their door, it’s also delicious. Customers aren’t going to believe they’re eating a pizza made on a gluten free crust when they try it. And the variety of fresh toppings that are available is a giant leap ahead.”

In an effort to remain open and informative about Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, Domino’s has created a video on YouTube that allows customers to decide whether this product is suitable for their diet, found here: www.youtube.com/user/dominosvids.

“Offering Domino’s Gluten Free Crust is a big step for us, and we wanted to make sure we were doing it right,” said Doyle. “Domino’s is doing that by partnering with experts at the NFCA and by empowering the gluten sensitive community with the information they need.”

Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is available in stores across the U.S. in a small, 10-inch size only, and prices vary by store.

Domino’s pizza made with a Gluten Free Crust is prepared in a common kitchen with the risk of gluten exposure. The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness supports the availability of Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, but cannot recommend the pizza for customers with celiac disease. Customers with gluten sensitivities should exercise judgment in consuming this pizza.

About Domino’s Pizza®
Founded in 1960, Domino's Pizza is the recognized world leader in pizza delivery.  Domino’s is listed on the NYSE under the symbol “DPZ.”  As of the first quarter of 2012, through its global footprint primarily made up of locally-owned and operated franchises, Domino’s operated a network of 9,810 franchised and Company-owned stores in the United States and over 70 international markets.  During the first quarter of 2012, Domino’s had global retail sales of nearly $1.7 billion, comprised of over $830 million domestically and nearly $855 million internationally.  Domino's Pizza had global retail sales of over $6.9 billion in 2011, comprised of over $3.4 billion domestically and over $3.5 billion internationally. In May 2011, Pizza Today named Domino’s its “Chain of the Year” for the second straight year – making the company a three-time overall winner, and the first pizza delivery company to receive the honor in back-to-back years.  In 2011, Domino’s was ranked #1 in Forbes Magazine’s “Top 20 Franchises for the Money” list.  

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63 Responses:

 
Tracey
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said this on
09 May 2012 11:08:48 AM PST
We were totally surprised to see the NFCA endorse this. It makes it even more difficult for the gluten free community to determine and trust what products are truly safe.

 
Terri
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said this on
09 May 2012 11:36:01 AM PST
I emailed Domino's, letting them know how poor this choice is. Here is there response:
Thank you for contacting the Domino’s Pizza Customer Care Team. The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness estimates that approximately 18 million Americans have a gluten sensitivity. While we can’t recommend our Gluten Free Crust for everyone, it provides an option to many impacted by gluten sensitivity that didn’t have a great-tasting pizza option before – and we hope this is a step toward a solution for many of these choice consumers.

In addition to consulting with the NFCA along the process of training and testing – as well as earning its GREAT Kitchens Amber Designation for being an option for those with gluten sensitivity – Domino’s wants to continue to be as informative as possible. We encourage you to watch a video, featuring our Chief Executive Officer Patrick Doyle, that explains that while our Gluten Free Crust itself is free from gluten, we operate in a common kitchen and cannot recommend this product for those with celiac disease.
DISCLAIMER: Thank you for your interest in our New Gluten Free Crust! Domino’s pizza made with a Gluten Free Crust is prepared in a common kitchen with the risk of gluten exposure. The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness supports the availability of Domino’s Gluten Free Crust, but CANNOT recommend the pizza for customers with celiac disease. Customers with gluten sensitivities should exercise judgment in consuming this pizza.



Most sincerely,

Domino's Pizza Customer Care

 
Robert Sheehan
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said this on
09 May 2012 12:30:03 PM PST
Going from excited to disappointment, the NFCA has to do a better job in giving their approval to something as serious as gluten free food.

 
Mary
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said this on
27 Jun 2012 5:38:30 PM PST
Thank you for saying what we are all thinking!

 
Anne
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said this on
09 May 2012 12:57:02 PM PST
We are so disappointed in the NFCA and Domino's. It seems that they are catering to the GF fad as those are the only people that can eat the pizza. I hope that Domino's will consider a wise investment and make real GF pizzas.

 
Jason Lengerd
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said this on
09 May 2012 1:04:57 PM PST
Celiacs have been sold out and sold a bill of goods by NFCA.

How can they keep a straight face with this release unless it is because of the dollars?

 
NFCA
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said this on
09 May 2012 1:51:15 PM PST
Scott,

We appreciate your concern with this matter, and we are thankful that you offered us the invitation to respond.

To begin, we created the GREAT Kitchens expansion to addresses what we feel is a self-guided, unsupervised gluten-free movement that has spread nationwide. Our multimedia training program is designed to address the misinformation, confusion and a lack of understanding regarding the differences between gluten-free ingredients, cross-contamination and what is, in fact, safe for consumption.

To accompany this training, we created a credentialing – A Green and Amber Designation.

We created a Green Designation for those restaurants willing to go through the extensive effort of using gluten-free ingredients, putting their staff through comprehensive training and ensuring that there are strict cross-contamination controls in their kitchens.

For all of those restaurants that are not prepared to meet these three standards, we offer the Amber Designation, which acknowledges that the restaurant is using gluten-free ingredients and has completed staff training to understand the health needs of those with gluten-related disorders. However, these restaurants cannot guarantee an environment free of cross-contamination. Instead, their staff is trained to communicate these potential risks, as Domino’s has done by including their disclaimer in all communications about the Gluten Free Crust and posting the video that you noted.

Domino’s partnered with NFCA because they wanted input from gluten-free experts. Instead of launching a gluten-free product independently, they actively sought out the NFCA and its GREAT Kitchens program to understand the safest, most transparent way to go to market. NFCA helped Domino’s realize that the handcrafted nature of their pizzas and current store operations cannot guarantee a gluten-free pizza free of cross-contamination. As a patient advocacy organization, we felt it was our obligation to ensure that the potential cross-contamination was communicated to consumers.

The GREAT Kitchens program is taking the steps to address those restaurants who promote gluten-free options without training, transparency or even knowledge of cross-contamination. Ultimately, we hope to move all restaurants to a Green Designation. We need your support in encouraging your local restaurant to do just that. Ask them to go the extra mile.

Again, thank you for the opportunity to respond. We hope to gain the community’s support as we move forward with our mission to eliminate the self-guided restaurateur and educate America’s restaurants on what it takes to fully meet gluten-free needs.

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
09 May 2012 3:31:20 PM PST
Thank you for your reply. While I support guiding more restaurants towards safety for celiacs, I don't think that is what is going on in the case of Domino's. Actually, I think the NFCA putting their stamp of approval on this, which is what you have done, could actually end up hurting many celiacs, and that is who you are supposed to be helping, isn't it? So is it safe to say then, that anyone can get an "Amber Designation" from you, even if the likelihood of cross-contamination is extremely high? Again, I think putting the NFCA's stamp of approval on anyone who wants it is a very bad idea. Also, besides taking money from Domino's to get your approval, what did you contribute to making their pizzas safer for celiacs? It sounds to me like they launched this line of pizzas exactly how they intended in the first place, which is making them unsafe for celiacs. What influence did you have on them?

 
NFCA
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said this on
10 May 2012 5:53:14 AM PST
When Domino’s approached us asking for help with the launch of its Gluten Free Crust, we absolutely hoped, just like all of you, that this pizza would be safe for all those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Unfortunately, after reviewing operating procedures we realized that we could not recommend this product for those with celiac disease, and we would need to urge those with gluten sensitivity to exercise judgment in deciding whether to order this pizza. We helped Domino's see that, too.

Domino’s heeded our advice to include a disclaimer for the celiac community, as we all felt it was critical to be open and honest regarding who could consume this pizza. In fact, the disclaimer pops up when you select Gluten Free Crust from their online ordering system, and staff has also been trained to read the disclaimer to all customers who request a Gluten Free Crust over the phone. The disclaimer states unequivocally that the pizza is not recommended for people with celiac disease.

We can also assure you that the Amber Designation is not an easy designation to earn. We believe the Amber designation is a first step in addressing those restaurants who promote gluten-free options without training or even knowledge of cross-contamination. While we may agree to disagree about this approach, we believe we have put in place a system that can minimize the confusion, motivate an industry to train their staffs properly and, ultimately, move all restaurants to a Green Designation, including Domino’s Pizza.

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
10 May 2012 1:38:06 PM PST
I think you need to get rid of the "Amber" designation...to me if Domino's can get it anyone can. One good analogy is what if a national Italian chain launched "gluten-free spaghetti," but then cooked their gluten-free pasta in the same water as their regular wheat pastas...it seems they could get Amber Designation from you if they just told everyone about it via a disclaimer, right? The issue is that they are calling it "gluten-free" when the end product likely is not, and that they are using your name "NFCA" to back them up, implying that it is somehow ok and save because you are attached to it. Last, people in my forum are calling local Domino's and nobody is getting read a disclaimer, and this is only the first week, fresh after your extensive training, right? What happens a year from now...there is high turnover in that industry you know?

 
Kevin
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said this on
14 May 2012 9:37:07 AM PST
I understand what the NFCA is trying to do here, but I don't think they quite got it right. They're basically making two categories, one for people who make some effort to avoid gluten, but don't mind if they ingest it occasionally. These are people that haven't been diagnosed with celiac (hopefully) but choose the diet because it either makes them feel better, or they're caught up with all the hype. The amber designation is meant for them. Then there are the people with celiac who are very careful to avoid gluten entirely because it makes them sick. The green designation is for them.

The problem lies in the fact that they use the words gluten-free too freely in both designations. Gluten-free, truly gluten-free, means no chance of gluten being present in a food (except out of pure human error which no amount of training can ever prevent entirely). You CAN'T refer to restaurants with an amber designation as providing gluten-free food. I don't care what you call it, gluten light, low gluten, some gluten, etc. But when there is any known risk of cross contamination, the terms gluten-free shouldn't be in any way associated with that food or restaurant.

It's fine if the NFCA wants to support the spectrums from gluten intolerance to gluten allergy, but they need to be clearly designated from each other. The press release stating Dominoes has a gluten free crust is incorrect. It's more accurate to state they have a pizza with low levels of gluten. Instead of "gluten free" with a disclaimer, just call it what it is so the Celiac community knows up front to stay away.

 
Jonathan
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said this on
10 May 2012 4:23:17 PM PST
Here's what I find most disturbing about all of the NFCA's responses to this criticism (both here and on their website): They appear to be far more interested in defending and rationalizing their actions than they are in accurately informing and protecting people with celiac disease.

 
Cristie K
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said this on
14 May 2012 9:04:47 AM PST
I find I want to be mad at Domino's for getting my hopes up but really I feel they have been very clear in repeating "it's not safe for celiacs". In our family anytime I find a restaurant offering gluten-free options I never assume they know what it really takes and dig further. Well I will just have to wait until Chucky Cheese brings their truly gluten-free pizza to California.

 
Jerri
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said this on
15 May 2012 9:42:39 AM PST
Then I really don't think you should call yourselves the National Foundation for CELIAC Awareness. If you truly cared about those of us with CELIAC DISEASE, you would not even have an amber designation--you would only certify truly gluten-free restaurants. This is so disappointing and disheartening.

 
Terry
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said this on
09 May 2012 3:18:57 PM PST
I asked point blank if they took money from Domino's on NFCA's facebook page, and they admit it! I thanked them for further hurting the GF branding that I rely on and will not return to that page.

 
Mark
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said this on
09 May 2012 5:11:56 PM PST
All of the credentialing programs (GIG, NFCA) accept money, so this is a non-starter.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
09 May 2012 8:39:01 PM PST
You are incorrect, they actually require batch testing on the end product to maintain their certifications...if they fail a test they must make big changes or they will lose their certifications...this is a very different thing indeed. The NFCA is endorsing them even though they know they will likely fail any test that will put their pizza's under 20ppm, and they are not safe for their own members. No testing is required by the NFCA, and obviously they admit the pizzas are not gluten-free, yet they seem to back Domino's headline claiming that they have a "gluten-free crust."

 
Mark
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said this on
09 May 2012 5:16:35 PM PST
As the NFCA has explained, the Amber designation is available for business that have GF ingredients per se but for whatever reason don't hold out that the end product is safe for everyone. Domino's was coming out with this pizza regardless of the NFCA's involvement, so the NFCA was proactive in letting its core constituency know that it wasn't safe.

As far as money goes, this very site accepts payment for product reviews, so the idea of criticizing the NFCA for accepting money is ludicrous. In any event, it's unlikely that Domino's would advertise on a site called "celiac.com" given that the pizza isn't appropriate for many who read it.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
09 May 2012 8:34:54 PM PST
How wrong you are Mark...Domono's ads did start running on this site in the Ads by Google areas the day they launched their so called "gluten-free" pizza, so they are actively buying ad space on google under the terms "gluten-free pizza." I could easily accept their money and display them, but I instead chose the correct choice--to block them. I went into my Google AdWords account and blocked all ads from dominos.com. I won't take their money, unlike the NFCA, who, through their Amber Designation will apparently take anyone's money.

 
Suzy
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said this on
09 May 2012 6:43:51 PM PST
I am extremely disappointed to continually read that Alice Bast, NFCA founder, tasted the pizza after special safeguards were put in place for her to avoid cross contamination, and she calls it "delicious." That's an endorsement, folks, and it's an endorsement under false pretenses. Then the NFCA has the nerve to not recommend the pizza to celiacs when their own founder has tried it and endorsed it. Who is guiding the leadership of the NFCA? Some feel betrayed, not unlike the Komen situation. I wish the NFCA would do or say something to restore our faith in them again but in the absence of that, I will now rely on GIG.

 
ladyjane85
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said this on
10 May 2012 5:12:13 PM PST
This was the most informative forum I've read about Domino's and their "gluten-free" crust. As a celiac sufferer myself, I was ecstatic to hear that Domino's was putting out gluten free crust and not because I had missed out on delivery pizza - I have been purchasing gluten free pizza from Extreme Pizza in Modesto, CA for almost 2 years now. They have two kitchens that are completely separate; ovens, ingredients...everything. Of course they charge an arm and a leg for their GF pizza (which is why I was excited about Domino's) but at least I know it’s legit.
While I agree that Domino's should make their disclaimer just as obvious as the words 'gluten-free' (I mean, come on now, stop teasing me! Before my diagnosis I was a beer and pizza kind of gal and now I’m genuinely frustrated that I can’t…ever.) we HAVE to become advocates for our own health and STOP taking someone's word for it.
For years my doc said that my celiac symptoms were in my head he has been replaced- if I took his word for it I'd be looped out on pills. Instead, I did my own research and sure enough, he was wrong. My new physician said that I had been undiagnosed for at least 10-15 years. I grew up believing every word my doc said, but now I know that regardless of what medical condition you have - it is best to research it for yourself. Maybe it’s just me, but it was like pulling teeth to get a diagnosis - and I just can't take anyone's word for it anymore.

 
mavis foster
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said this on
15 May 2012 2:36:46 PM PST
I had to pay £250 english pounds to find out that I was allergic to gluten. But when i told the doctors they just said the information would be added to my records.
I went to a Pizza Hut in the UK and took my own sealed gluten free pizza base which they filled and cooked but I ended up ill due to the grated cheese being tossed in flour.
Therefore the same could happen with Domino's?

 
Elissa
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said this on
11 May 2012 9:02:07 PM PST
While I understand that this is upsetting, I think that the benefits of this are being overlooked. Just the fact that a large national chain is now offering an option for those with gluten sensitivity will generate huge awareness of celiac and gluten sensitivity. More and more companies will take interest in doing the same and many of those will implement the proper cross contamination procedures. Not every single restaurant or take out/delivery company has the space on premise to have a second kitchen. Other companies who learn about what Domino's is doing will understand quickly that by operating to serve gluten free at the level that they are able, that they will gain many more customers. While the NFCA may not have gone about this in an ideal way, this is a win win for celiacs in the bigger picture. Doctors are now just starting to acknowledge that the celiac problem is much larger than the medical establishment ever realized and most of those who are not C/or gluten sensitive have no idea what that is or what it is like. Humanity including the NFCA is in a learning curve and there will be growing pains and trial and error to get this right, but at least people are taking a step in the right direction. Anger and violent opposition are not really helpful to the process - a constructive and collaborative approach would go a lot farther.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
13 May 2012 11:47:25 PM PST
What about the celiacs who will eat Domino's "gluten-free" pizzas and get injured...and perhaps end up with lymphoma? They should not be using the term "gluten-free" if the end product is not...it is that simple, otherwise it will lead to serious injury for many people who do not understand this.

 
Christine Ford
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said this on
12 May 2012 11:59:45 AM PST
I am very disappointed in the fact that the NFCA is not being black and white here....there is no gray!! Either it's GF or it's not. I am trying desperately to educate our local restaurants in my community. Something like this goes against what I am doing. Celiac disease is serious!

 
Grogan
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said this on
13 May 2012 3:29:03 PM PST
I understand that in Australia, restaurants that prepare gluten based dishes in their kitchens can only claim 'low gluten' irrespective of whether the dish/ingredients are gluten free. This helps to serve as a warning for consumers, rather than expecting something claiming to be 'gluten free' is also prepared, cooked and served in a manner that ensures the final product is in fact gluten free.

 
Nick
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:08:59 AM PST
This is right on the money. NFCA should also adopt this standard rather than "amber" and "green" certifications.

 
Janice Polk
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said this on
13 May 2012 3:46:25 PM PST
As a new person diagnoised with celiac I am truly disappointed in NFCA and in Domino's Pizza. If I hadn't gone in and asked for info I would assumed that the pizza was safe for me to eat. What a disappointment. Gluten Free should only be put on truly gluten free products.

 
Yvonne
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said this on
14 May 2012 3:43:03 AM PST
I was appalled that the NFCA got involved in this matter. It feels like they got some type of payback. In fact, as far as I am concerned the pizza truly is not gluten-free since the cross contamination will be occurring at a high level. Don't even advertise it as gluten-free.

 
Gabrielle
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said this on
14 May 2012 5:27:33 AM PST
We MUST assume that not everyone fully understands that "gluten-free" does NOT mean "safe for people with celiac disease" so by calling their crust gluten-free, that endangers the health of a LOT of people! LOW GLUTEN would be the more RESPONSIBLE thing to do here (GO AUSTRALIA!)...I'm very disappointed with NFCA. Maybe they need a good bout of gluten side effects for about a month straight to understand how irresponsible their decision was there........

 
Diana
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said this on
14 May 2012 5:28:06 AM PST
Sounds like being "a little pregnant." Either you' re gluten-free or you're not! Obviously they are not. Has the NFCA become another big agency that can't be trusted? I look forward to their response.

 
Nick
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:06:09 AM PST
The main problem with NFCA's seal of approval on this is use of the term "gluten-free." I think they should get rid of "amber vs. green" and replace that with "reduced gluten" vs. "gluten-free." What Domino's is pushing is not certifiably "gluten-free" in any sense of the phrase.

 
Jenny
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:16:34 AM PST
I stopped and talked with our local Domino's. I think if they put the crust on foil to fill with toppings and to bake, cut with a clean cutter and change their gloves before putting on the toppings we should be okay. We spend our winters in Florida and Tuesday is pizza night with our group. I take my gluten-free crust to the local pizza joint. They keep it on my foil and use a clean cutter and change gloves. I have never had a problem and think if we ask our locals at Domino's to do the same we will be okay.

 
Connie
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:37:54 AM PST
This is extremely disappointing. It's hard enough to find truly gluten-free foods in restaurants. Domino's has no business advertising their lower-gluten pizza as gluten-free. It is not only misleading but potentially very confusing (and dangerous in some cases) to patrons and restaurant workers. It has been my experience in the past 6 years that many restaurant workers don't understand what gluten-free means (but many, thankfully, are very educated!). I have become ill too many times because of kitchen staff or servers who didn't really understand how important gluten-free food is to those of us whose health requires it. Domino's is just jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon and catering to the fad dieters. And then they charge more for the so-called gluten-free pizza! Very disappointing that NFCA is adding to the confusion.

 
KatinNYC
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:40:59 AM PST
It's disturbing that as the 'gluten-free' trend continues to 'roll,' various chains are jumping on the bandwagon but potentially making people sick due to cross-contamination or poor handling procedures. I try to avoid chains at all cost, since I have gotten sick after eating at many of them, even with gluten-free menu options available.

The fact that the NFCA has given a gluten-free 'amber light' to Domino's is surprising and upsetting. We need safety for celiacs, not more grey areas.

 
Jeff Kelly
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said this on
14 May 2012 8:25:04 AM PST
There is really one real core issue, which is whether the DOUGH for both types of pizza crust will be rolled on the same tables, and we have no real information on this. Perhaps that is how Domino's wants it. I would be less concerned with common ovens and common topping areas than a common table to roll the two types of dough, and so should everyone.

 
dappycharlie
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said this on
14 May 2012 9:08:06 AM PST
here's my email to the NFCA: I am appalled by the NFCA’s announcement of Domino’s gluten-free pizza. There is no such thing as gluten-free if it is not made, cooked, stored, and distributed in an area that is devoid of ANY kind of gluten. Neither you, nor Domino’s should lay claim to a gluten-free product from them. As one who suffers from celiac, I am totally disappointed and have lost faith in your organization.

 
Denise
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said this on
14 May 2012 10:07:08 AM PST
They are not supporting celiacs at all. This is just a game for those who choose not to eat wheat. What good is that? I feel for those who will eat it without knowing and become sick from it. I know Still Riding pizza crusts are gluten-free and they supply a dedicated oven for their users. Why are they even doing this is the real question. But the bottom line is dollars and nothing more. Just as Orange Leaf says, their yogurts are gluten-free, when many contain malt syrup as well as wheat. I have had no luck in getting them to post this in their stores either. Again, the bottom dollar is more important. How sad. It's hard enough to have celiac disease, but to have people not take it seriously is just wrong.

 
Gene
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said this on
14 May 2012 10:19:44 AM PST
Informative. I have tried the Domino's gluten-free pizza without effects, but now realize it could be a crap shoot.

 
Olinda Paul
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said this on
14 May 2012 10:40:18 AM PST
I agree with those of you who say "either it IS or it ISN'T" is totally right. Would you give your child just a "little" poison in their food? No! you don't want any poison in their food. Gluten is POISON for celiacs. I am still shocked that the NFCA has done this. I work for this company and would NOT endorse this product for any kind of gluten sensitivity. This risk is too great. If they are just doing the fad thing, fine, it's their bodies... but for the rest of us... we like ourselves and want to live healthy and gluten-free.

 
Yvonne
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said this on
14 May 2012 10:47:53 AM PST
So glad I don't and can't rely on the government (lack of gluten-free standards) and other asundry agencies to tell what is 'safe' for me to eat. I am disappointed in Domino's, and even more disappointed in the NFCA.

 
Amber
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said this on
14 May 2012 11:59:42 AM PST
Gluten-free must be reserved to food that is actually gluten-free. Domino's, try low gluten if you are not trying to mislead. Such a big disappointment. If you can't make gluten-free happen, save us all the time and get rid of your faulty ads.

 
Lynn A. Reynolds
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said this on
14 May 2012 12:33:39 PM PST
I love to see all the discussion on this topic. When I first saw the news report on this I was skeptical because I'm very sensitive to wheat and gluten. I wondered how they were going to put in new ovens and keep things away from those with gluten. I knew it was too good to be true. I'll stick with those items that I know are not going to cause me to have a reaction. They are also opening themselves up to a lawsuit if something should happen to someone eating something that is supposedly gluten free.

 
Mark
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said this on
14 May 2012 3:24:46 PM PST
I emailed Domino's awhile ago wishing they would offer a gluten-free pizza, but this is a joke saying it's not for someone with celiac. I have to watch when I go to restaurants even getting a lemon wedge in my tea if the waitress doesn't pay attention then I get sick just from that. I won't be trying this pizza especially since it takes 21 days for your system to recover and absorb nutrients again. Not worth it for me.

 
Sandy
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said this on
14 May 2012 4:51:07 PM PST
I just finished sending an email to Domino's letting them know how I feel about their "gluten-free pizza ". I would encourage everyone who submitted a comment here to do the same. Let's keep them busy reading and answering questions about their newest business venture.

 
phil
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said this on
14 May 2012 4:57:20 PM PST
This is how they should do it if they were serious about offering gluten-free pizza -- from GarlicJims dot com, a west coast and Colorado pizza chain. They have the Gluten-Free Food Service Accreditation from the Gluten Intolerance Group.

"We store our gluten-free (GF) crusts in a separate place in our walk-in coolers and sauce them using dedicated spoodles (combination spoon/ladle) and dedicated sauce containers.
We place a GF crust on a dedicated GF screen and use GF peels and cutters to remove the pizza from the oven and cut it prior to delivery or pickup. We also use separate towels to clean our GF pizza cutters to ensure that there is no cross-contamination.

Further, we slap our regular pizzas in a GF flour mix so all the flour flying around in our stores is actually GF.

Our staff is trained to wash their hands before beginning the preparation of a GF pizza and to use special care not to bring the GF crusts into contact with anything that might lead to cross-contamination."

 
Annette
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said this on
14 May 2012 5:18:22 PM PST
How sad for all of us suffering from celiac disease. I feel this pizza is only out there for all of the people who want to be on a gluten-free diet to lose weight. Those who do not suffer as we do. They have no idea how hard it is to find good food when eating out. They just drive the cost of gluten-free foods up in our stores, because if you look at diet foods in our stores it is all ridiculously expensive. Those of you who do not suffer from celiac disease should walk in a celiac disease sufferers shoes for a week. Then maybe you would understand. Domino's needs to do a better job in their restaurants with this to truly say this pizza is gluten-free.

 
slkuster
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said this on
14 May 2012 6:08:26 PM PST
This issue leads me to ask about McDonald's in Finland. I was informed that because Finland has such a large portion (50%) that are celiac, McDonald's created a gluten-free bun. Just how gluten-free are these buns?

 
Jenn
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said this on
14 May 2012 9:43:53 PM PST
Wow. Also they aren't the 'first' pizza chain to come out with gluten-free pizza or (almost gluten-free pizza) Boston Pizza, Pizza Hotline, and Pizza Pizza all have had GF crusts for well over a year now. But as with ANY pizza place there is always a possibility of cross contamination. To err is human. Just unfortunate that such an error can make us horribly sick.

 
Janet Woodward
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said this on
15 May 2012 12:35:15 AM PST
The whole point is that the coeliacs (sorry I am a Brit and spell like a Brit) is that it's misleading and so disappointing...

End of term report card will read "must do better".

Wellfoods of Barnsley in UK do supply gluten-free pizzas to several pizza houses so it can be done...
You want the Brits to show you how it's done??

 
Liz
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said this on
15 May 2012 5:09:04 AM PST
I am still glad that Domino's have made an attempt at trying for a gluten-free pizza. I'm still excited about it, maybe because I'm not a celiac. I do have a gluten intolerance so I can tolerate things like the Domino's gluten-free pizza. I wish Pizza Hut would do the same thing. At least they're trying.

 
Nick
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said this on
15 May 2012 6:02:43 AM PST
I am glad I live in Michigan. We have Passport Pizza and they have a gluten-free menu. The gluten-free pizza is in its own cooking tray so no cross contamination in the preparation area. It also cooks in its own tray and when the employees cut the pizza they have a separate cutter just for the gluten-free pizza and breadsticks.
So Domino's can keep their almost gluten-free pizza because I will not be buying anything from them. Why even bother making something gluten-free if it's not completely gluten-free? It's the people with celiac disease that are truly in need of these products, not celebrities that 'choose' to eat gluten-free.

 
Jeanette
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said this on
15 May 2012 8:31:46 AM PST
This is clearly another company making a dollar on the new diet fad. Capitalism - I get it.
But, it's the NFCA endorsing this that I don't completely get. It's just going to confuse people even more. Taking action is great but this sounds a little half-assed.

 
Sarah
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said this on
15 May 2012 10:19:08 AM PST
How is this different from eating out anyplace else?

I will still eat this pizza. In fact, I have eaten two of them already. I live in a town with 0 gluten-free options when it comes to restaurants. The possibility of contamination at Domino's seems about the same as with anything I order from anyplace in my town. I applaud Domino's effort to offer a gluten-free crust, but yes, it would be better if they had a separate oven and preparation area.

But really, most restaurants make my food around gluten containing items all the time, and I am usually ok.

 
Mel
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said this on
15 May 2012 9:36:18 PM PST
Like any business, Dominos' goal is to make money by selling a product. Supply and demand should resolve this issue in time. I'm guessing the majority of people on a gluten-free diet are celiacs. If word continues to spread that their pizza is not safe for us, they won't sell enough gluten-free pizzas to make a decent profit. At that point, they will need to either pull the product from their line, or they will need to take steps to gain consumer confidence in the safety of their product by making modifications to their production process. My guess is that they set out to provide a product to ALL people on a gluten-free diet; however, they didn't do enough market research to understand the specific needs of their target consumers. I appreciate that they did try and that they consulted with a gluten-free expert organization -- just a little too late in the game. My personal opinion is that they should consider pulling the product (like California Pizza Kitchen did) to do more research, make modifications for a safer product, and then re-launch their gluten-free pizzas once again.

 
Cheryl Morris
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said this on
16 May 2012 8:27:44 AM PST
While I was grateful that I found out how unsafe the "gluten-free" pizza is at Domino's, I am also grateful that they are at least in the first stages of providing truly gluten-free options. I think that it's wonderful that they are delving into the complicated process of understanding how to serve the celiac population. I hope that enough consumers show interest in their endeavors so that they will continue to move forward and in the future can actually serve celiac patients. In the meantime, I won't be eating there but will be keeping an eye on the situation and will continue to be hopeful. Baby steps are better than nothing.

 
Ste
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said this on
16 May 2012 5:04:34 PM PST
I think everyone is reading the information incorrectly - the pizza IS gluten-free, however it's prepared in a kitchen with products that contain gluten. In such a litigious society - I doubt any lawyers would let a company make claims anything is 100% free of anything.

Much like a company might say that an egg salad sandwich 'may contain traces of peanuts'. There's no way there are peanuts in the sandwich, but the company has to cover itself, just in case...

 
Vicki
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said this on
16 May 2012 7:48:25 PM PST
I went ahead and tried Domino's gluten-free crust pizza since I have missed take-out pizza so much. Being gluten intolerant I thought that I should be okay, considering the message that gluten intolerant people can eat it. THEY ARE WRONG! After just 2 slices, I had a gluten reaction and have been sick & bloated for hours. PLEASE DO NOT TRY IT!

 
Aaron
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said this on
21 May 2012 8:24:29 AM PST
I am so happy to see that most people feel as I do. I do not have gluten intolerance but have a natural food grocery that specializes in gluten-free research. We contact every manufacturer and request information about their gluten-free nprocedures. Are they a gluten-free facility? Do they test for gluten? What level PPM do they accept? In doing so we have found that most do not know what to do but are happy to put gluten-free on their label. We require that the product is tested at 20ppm or that the product is made in a dedicated facility to receive a No Gluten Added status. We don't make the product so we will not say gluten-free but we verify regularly that the product meets these standards.
After years of hard work we now have a gluten-free bakery in a dedicated kitchen. We have found that cross-contamination is almost guaranteed when the facility is not gluten-free. It is hard for us to do all of this and see companies like Domino's hype up a contaminated product. They make those with celiac disease have a harder time to protect themselves.

 
Sally
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said this on
22 May 2012 9:02:16 AM PST
Sent to NFCA:

I have spent over 30 years of my life teaching myself and others about celiac disease. In the early days hardly anyone, including gastroenterologists, knew much about celiac disease. I am pleased that there are now investigators interested in celiac and that research dollars are now available for future studies.

I don't believe that most folks remember the word celiac, but they do understand gluten intolerant. It is more descriptive in nature, thus easier for them to remember than celiac. My friends are now better able to understand my affliction and are anxious to help me stay gluten free as we dine out in public.

I can't tell you how many of my friends have suggested we get pizza at Dominos. I was hesitant to do so, but decided to check out the local store. Sure enough, it didn't pass my visual inspection, but I decided to take the risk as I really couldn't see all areas of the kitchen. I ordered the pizza, and have been having a hard time since I ate it. All my personal typical symptoms of gluten poison happened within a day or two. I am recovering nicely, but I simply cannot understand why a company would make a gluten free product that isn't gluten free. Economics would be my best guess--sell pizza, make money!

Now I have to explain to people that I can't eat Dominos because it isn't really gluten free. Well, the crust is--but not the preparation. This is really confusing. And I thought we had come so far on educating people. Not so. It is more confusing that ever to the average bear.

I am really upset that you have endorsed Domino's on this topic. The separate ingredients may be gluten-free, but if the sum total of the dish or the preparation of the dish is not, it has to be declared as not gluten free.

What will stop other food manufacturers or restaurants from copying Domino's approach to semi-gluten free? It is like being semi-pregnant!

Please reverse your statements on Domino's Pizza. This somewhat gluten-free position is disappointing.

 
jw2012
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said this on
23 May 2012 2:29:57 PM PST
So I have several issues here.

1. Unless you are using the gluten-free diet as a 'fad' diet then this pizza isn't ok. Who chooses to eat gluten free pizza if they don't have to? Not many people - certainly not enough to make a national chain keep it on the menu.

2. By having the NFCA endorse this pizza IN ANY WAY misrepresents their stated goals. By the way – I briefly browsed the site and could not find any information on this ‘amber’ certification and what it means. It also cheapens the plight for REAL celiacs who do get sick because when you certify a non-gluten free pizza. For those of us who have been around for a while we know that acts like this only hurt our cause and not help it. It gives the impression to uneducated people that it really is OK to eat a little gluten and that we are all hypochondriacs like they all thought to begin with…

3. I now question ANY product certified by the NFCA and won’t rely on their certification certifications seal from this point forward so they have jeopardized their entire client base (both manufacturers and consumers) by this irrational decision. Now that I think of it I have a lot of problems with products they certify so maybe even their ‘green’ certification is a scam too.

4. I can't seem to find one single way this is helping celiacs. Their mission and values statement says. I'm not sure how them certifying a non-gluten free product is meeting any of these:

Mission:
Through empowerment, education and advocacy, the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) drives diagnoses of celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders and improves the quality of life for those on a lifelong gluten-free diet.

Values:
We believe in a patient-centered healthcare model that is grounded in science, promotes collaboration and supports a comprehensive approach to health and wellness.

Strategies:
Empowerment: NFCA empowers patients to take responsibility for their own health and provides the information and tools necessary to maximize their health and quality of life.

Education: NFCA educates individuals, healthcare providers and the food industry to understand the needs of those maintaining a gluten-free diet and to support patients in seeking an improved quality of life, beginning with an accurate diagnosis.

Advocacy: NFCA advocates for access to high quality healthcare, along with gluten-free food and drug safety standards, by providing training and resources to the food industry and regulatory agencies.

 
said this on
23 May 2012 4:46:01 PM PST
With regard to you being unable to find information on the NFCA's 'amber' designation, this is probably because they have since suspended use of it and removed any information relating to it from their website.

 
Rebecca
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said this on
06 Jul 2012 1:09:25 PM PST
If you eat food prepared by anyone other than yourself, or made in a dedicated 100% GF facility, you are taking the chance that a mistake could be made, and you could ingest some amount of gluten. Not everyone with celiac disease is so sensitive (or perhaps, so wealthy!) that they are willing to restrict their dining options to that level. There are many people like me - I personally know quite a few - who do have celiac, have been tested and diagnosed by legitimate doctors, but whose symptoms are minor or nonexistent. I myself had the gastroenterologist work with me for an hour, trying to find something, anything, that we could consider a celiac symptom. We couldn't. Since there is so little information on the effects of not following a gluten-free diet on asymptomatic celiacs (the only study I read that directly addressed it found no significant differences in mortality, cancer rates, or any other illness), we don't feel the need to by hypersensitive about accidentally ingesting one molecule of gluten. That means I will ask people about the ingredients in their food, but then I will trust them to be telling the truth. It also means that I know there is a possibility of someone making an innocent mistake that results in my consuming some gluten. I understand that for those who are very sensitive, there is great motivation to avoid getting anywhere near gluten because of the painful reactions that can follow. But please keep in mind the growing numbers of us who might get sick from eating a slice of non-gluten-free pizza, but will be fine after eating gluten-free pizza that was cooked in the same oven as non-gluten-free pizza. For me, gluten-free Domino's pizza means I can actually find something for myself and my son to eat when there are no other options, or when we are traveling in a new area. I think their disclaimer gives us the information we need: this pizza is not safe for those who are very sensitive, but it is fine for those who can deal with the possibility of trace amounts of gluten.

Realize also that many of the so-called gluten-free products we spend so much money on and so much time searching out are not tested or verified in any way. You have to be willing to ask the pertinent questions yourself, and to put a certain amount of trust in the people who are going to prepare your food. If you aren't, then plan on cooking everything for yourself, because anyone is capable of making a mistake.




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