Celiac.com 09/28/2012 - Two researchers recently set out to study gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. The study was conducted by A. Di Sabatino A, and G.R. Corazza of the Centro per lo Studio e la Curia della Mallatia Celiaca at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo at the University of Pavia in Italy.

Photo: CC--teuobkA number of studies support the existence non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which can be marked by both internal and external symptoms in individuals with normal small-bowel mucosa and negative results on serum anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody testing. These symptoms are very similar to traditional celiac disease symptoms, and seem to improve or disappear with the adoption of a gluten-free diet.

Although researchers are currently debating the clinical aspects of this condition, studies indicate that the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the general population may be many times higher than that of celiac disease.

Further study and diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is being hindered by the lack of a clear definition of the condition. The lack of a clear definition is due at least in part to the fact that there is no single known cause, and the symptoms are likely influenced by a variety of factors.

More work needs to be done to establish a clear definition for non-celiac gluten intolerance, and to delineate diagnostic protocols. The research team notes that if it turns out that non-celiac gluten sensitivity does in fact have multiple triggers, then treatment options should vary accordingly.

However, any treatment would likely include a gluten-free diet.

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