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Will a Pill Soon Enable Celiac Patients to Eat Gluten?

Celiac.com 01/16/2013 - Scientists are making progress on the creation of a pill that would allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten in much the same way that lactase pills allow people with lactose intolerance to eat dairy products without upsetting digestion.

Photo: CC--doug88888As with lactase, the approach involves the use of an enzyme to break down the gluten that causes celiac symptoms.

When people consume wheat, rye or barley, enzymes in the stomach break down gluten into smaller pieces, called peptides. For most people, these peptides are harmless. But for the 2 million-3 million Americans with celiac disease, the peptides trigger an autoimmune response and painful symptoms.

Currently, the only way for people with celiac disease to avoid the autoimmune response and the accompanying symptoms is to avoid gluten altogether.

However, Justin Siegel, Ingrid Swanson Pultz and colleagues think that an enzyme might be able to further break down the offending peptides in the stomach, thus permitting people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten-containing foods.

Their efforts led to the discovery of a naturally occurring enzyme that has some of the ideal properties for doing so. They then used a computer to modify the enzyme in the laboratory so that it would do the job completely.

The newly engineered enzyme, which they called KumaMax, breaks down more than 95 percent of gluten peptides associated with celiac disease in acidic conditions that mimic the stomach.

Clearly, further research and trials are needed, but these early results make the new enzyme a strong candidate for oral use in the treatment of celiac disease.

What do you think? Would you take spill that allowed your body to safely digest gluten from wheat, barley or rye without any of the symptoms or damage associated with celiac disease? Share your thoughts in the comments box below.


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80 Responses:

 
Carol powers
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said this on
16 Jan 2013 5:33:41 AM PST
I take enzymes now if I'm not sure if there's gluten in my meal and it helps a lot so yes I loved the article and I hope this pill comes out soon!!! So excited!!

 
Mar
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 8:50:40 AM PST
Did you notice the part that says they "used a computer to modify the enzyme in the laboratory"? This is a genetically modified enzyme, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have the potential to cause all sorts of problems/imbalances in our bodies. In fact, some people argue that GMOs are to blame for the plethora of food allergies we are seeing in the US today (BT Corn might be causing a leaky gut and allowing food particles to enter the bloodstream, in-turn causing the immune system to react to these foods). I worry that long term, using a genetically modified enzyme to treat Celiac disease could actually make matters worse for people who are already dealing with serious digestive issues. Who knows in what ways this human engineered enzyme will interact with the naturally occurring enzymes and flora in our gut, not to mention the lining of our digestive system.

 
Ruth
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said this on
24 Jan 2013 1:52:03 PM PST
I agree, Mar.
I would want to see a lot more research and doctors' approval before I would even consider taking such a pill.

 
Dr Who
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said this on
06 Feb 2013 2:08:35 PM PST
While you should be careful, there are several medicines already on the market worth trying. For example, Glutenzyme, HLC Mindlinx, and Glutenease. These products, especially the former 2, are proven VERY effective in tests, and are available on the market. While you try these products on your own risk, I think that for people with anything but the most extremely severe symptoms, even those with intestinal damage such as myself, I think it is worth it to start VERY slow on the gluten and give it a try. If anything goes wrong, stop eating gluten and stop taking the medication.

 
ACurtis
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 3:08:21 PM PST
I agree with you, Mar. GMOs make me very, very suspicious.

 
Gosia
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 7:44:54 AM PST
Good point, Mar!!! I'm so glad you wrote this! I would be very skeptical to try it too. Why put something harmful in your body to fight off another harmful product?

 
Janine Quisenberry
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said this on
23 Jan 2013 7:12:33 AM PST
I agree. I eat much healthier since I was diagnosed and do not want to go back to some of the unhealthy ingredients I used to ingest. I might use a pill if I was traveling but not on an every day basis. I now prefer my healthy unprocessed food!


 
Ian Neilson
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said this on
25 Mar 2013 6:34:04 PM PST
You see, GMOs MIGHT cause problems, but there are two things to consider about that. 1. They MIGHT NOT cause problems. Like you said, SOME people argue that. I have heard that, but where is the evidence? 2. Some GMOs might or might now cause problems, but saying some GMOs cause problems is different than saying because this is genetically modified, it's a problem. I would agree that you need a doctor's approval.

 
John Smith
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said this on
05 Aug 2014 12:55:46 PM PST
10-4 Ian. Humans have been ingesting GMOs for years. Technically, selective breeding is genetic modification. Most fears of GMOs are as rational as a fear of the dark. Unless, of course, you are actually afraid of the Vashta Narada.

 
michelle

said this on
05 Jun 2013 8:14:30 AM PST
I don't think genetically modifying a pill is the same as genetically modifying corn so that it has built-in pesticides. I would try this for me and my children when we go out to eat, but continue to eat gluten-free at home.

 
Jlove

said this on
12 Mar 2015 10:50:17 AM PST
That is not what genetically modified means. The pharm industry is always using computers to optimize chemicals and proteins, etc. You actually have to change/alter/modify the genetic components to call it GMO.

 
Andra
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 4:07:05 PM PST
Carol Powers: what enzymes do you take?

 
Kim
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said this on
01 Jun 2013 5:51:28 PM PST
Carol where do you get the enzymes and what are they called?

 
Jobe
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said this on
16 Jan 2013 6:42:02 AM PST
Not sure about this; I don't like taking pills. Though I may consider this if I was eating out or going somewhere other than home. Then I could be sure that any contamination would be okay. At home, I don't have to worry. So yes maybe it would be useful when away from home where you are not sure about how careful they are being.

 
Carrie L
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said this on
16 Jan 2013 7:44:23 AM PST
Can't wait for that pill and to stop worrying about everything I eat!

 
Katherine
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said this on
16 Jan 2013 8:10:04 AM PST
Yes, but just to drink beer and eat pizza and flour tortillas!

 
John S
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said this on
16 Jan 2013 9:25:26 AM PST
95%? I'd need 100%. In practice, not just the lab. I'd also need to have the safety and efficacy of the enzyme well tested, and even then time periods and numbers tested would be small. Finally, at what cost? I'd distinguish between something to help for an accidental gluten ingestion, versus something for regular consumption like lactase has been promoted.

 
ACurtis
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 3:18:05 PM PST
I agree, MTP: digestive enzymes are already on the market. I and my family have gluten intolerance; we buy a very expensive brand and use them to help break down both gluten and dairy in case of accidental ingestion. While they help, I don't know if I'd go so far as to say, hey! a digestive enzyme will cure everything and allow you to eat gluten and never get sick again! Um, as Mar states above, the enzyme has been genetically modified (GMOs, anyone?). I don't put ANY stock in GMOs because I personally do not believe they are good for the body. I think tinkering and tampering with what nature has given us will end up hurting rather than helping in the long run.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
01 Feb 2013 5:13:01 PM PST
I am unaware of ANY currently available enzyme that allows people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten. Perhaps you can enlighten us with the name of the product and the scientific studies to back that up.

 
Carissa B
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 5:18:24 AM PST
John s,
I agree with you. When i read this and saw 95 percent I thought why not 100 percent or at least 99. That's not enough for me. And cost is a concern for me too. If it were a higher percentage I'd still only take it on certain occasions. I want to see more testing done first.

 
MTP
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said this on
17 Jan 2013 2:05:46 PM PST
digestive enzymes that break down the gluten peptide already exist but now PHARMA is trying to capitalize here and make people think the only way to get them is from your medical doctor!

 
Jesse
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 9:14:23 PM PST
I have learned that taking pysillium seed powder in a glass of water before eating gluten prevent problems for me.

 
Sandra
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 4:34:48 AM PST
True about PHARMA making an enzyme that already exists into a drug (maybe tweaking it a little to get it patented). There are enzymes out now that hone in on dairy and gluten. By the way, there are plenty of folks who still think their dairy allergy stems from an inability to digest lactose, when in reality, they cannot digest the casein in milk. Lactase does nothing for them.

 
Amy
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 5:42:17 AM PST
I use it as a safety thing when eating out in restaurants or over a friends for dinner. I've taken lactaid for years and don't find it cumbersome at all, sounds like this would be much the same.

 
Stephen
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 6:20:02 AM PST
Would I take this pill? It depends. If it is 95% effective and I'm very sensitive to gluten, I still may experience troubling symptoms. Also, if the cost is high, as it likely will be for complex drug like this and companies needing to recoup their R&D investment, then I may wait for affordable generic versions with the added benefit of seeing if any rare adverse events emerge once the drug is on the market.

 
Donna
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 7:12:39 PM PST
Like Stephen, I'm super sensitive to gluten and have dermatitis herpetiformis. All it takes is gluten the size of a grain of salt to activate my symptoms. So the pill would have to be 100% effective for me. Also wait for adverse reactions. In time maybe the chemists will figure it out. Until then, I eaten gluten-free.

 
Laura
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 6:48:10 AM PST
I would ABSOLUTELY take it!!!! Pizza and bagels? It's been 11 years!!!! YES!!!!

 
Jan
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 6:49:07 AM PST
I can't wait!!! I would definitely take a pill that would allow me to go out with my family and eat the same things they do.

 
Mick
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 7:09:05 AM PST
Absolutely would gladly take this.

 
Sarah
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 7:22:26 AM PST
With further testing, this could have real implications in giving celiacs on a gluten free diet a chance to travel/eat socially more freely. I think it would take a LOT of long term research to ensure 100% safety and put celiacs back on a gluten containing diet, but if this pill can disrupt the effects of small amounts of contamination for those on a gluten free diet, it could give us a lot more freedom to take "risks."

 
Sara in Brooklyn
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 7:51:44 AM PST
Well, I'll certainly never eat gluten again, pill or no pill. 95% still leaves 5% available to make us sicker than sick... Also - in my experience, plenty of pills have *other* ingredients that are hard to tolerate (fillers, binders, inks/dyes...). Lactase is a naturally occurring enzyme that breaks down the *sugar* lactose. Proteins are a whole 'nother story - and no one can assert, based on evidence, that the OTHER components of wheat protein are going to be tolerated.

NO THANKS.

 
Barb
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 3:14:26 PM PST
I agree with you. I am not going to take it. I may keep something around just in case I get gluten by accident but otherwise I found most of the meds they make make me sick and don't work.

 
Michael
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 5:58:50 PM PST
I absolutely agree with you, Sara. Furthermore, Dr. Kenneth Fine says only 1% of all Americans have HLA-DQB genes which do not predispose them to gluten intolerance, and Dr. Rodney Ford says gluten is bad for everyone. Wheat germ agglutinin kills living cells in all mammals. The more pharmaceutical companies try to make gluten tolerable to us, the more food scientists will genetically modify wheat to be more addictive. I am just too sensitive to gluten and it is too harmful, even by breathing it.

NO THANKS!

 
Jeanette Rasmussen
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 8:38:24 AM PST
This medication has been available in Europe for at least 5 years and I hope they quit fiddling around with it while I am still alive and can enjoy it.

 
Carolyn
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 9:11:08 AM PST
No, I wouldn't take a pill unless it not only took care of the immediate symptoms, but also the "arsenic" effect it has on my quality of life. Gluten predisposes us to CA, Scleraderma, Lupus and many other diseases. So just making it easy to consume gluten without immediate symptoms is not safe enough.

 
Rocky
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 9:12:23 AM PST
No doubt about it. Absolutely yes if proven safe and effective. It would reopen so many doors for travel and social events that I have to avoid because of the food contamination problem now.

 
Jeannie
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 9:55:20 AM PST
I would take the pill only as a protective measure if I had to eat something I was not 100% sure was gluten-free. I would not knowingly eat gluten in any significant quantity.

 
sandy
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 5:31:36 PM PST
I would definitely consider it. But I agree with another comment about the GMOs. I think I also have a problem with them as well, but this may be worth a try. Maybe not for daily use but for occasional "cheating."

 
Shirley mills
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said this on
18 Jan 2013 11:07:52 PM PST
Yes I would take the pill to eat something with gluten.

 
Mary
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said this on
19 Jan 2013 5:31:40 AM PST
I will be hesitant, but extremely excited that I would be able to have some real pizza and beer! It will sure make social events more enjoyable too!

 
Thelma
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said this on
19 Jan 2013 7:14:28 AM PST
You bet I would!! Where can I sign up for the trials? Thanks for this article.

 
Ron Marvil
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said this on
20 Jan 2013 4:15:25 AM PST
I would take the pill. It would BE great if it worked!!

 
Carol MacGregor
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 5:23:25 AM PST
I would most definitely take this pill when it becomes available. I surely would have been involved in the study also. Looking forward to this break through.

 
Kathy
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 5:53:40 AM PST
Hell yeah!!

 
Suzy
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 6:03:35 AM PST
I WOULD!! We are constantly traveling abroad, sometimes to 2nd and 3rd world countries and its impossible to avoid contamination. And try to explain your issue... good luck! So bring on that pill and maybe I can see more of these countries instead of just their bathrooms!

 
sandy Alexander
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 6:10:56 AM PST
Don't know? I was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Since STOPPING treating MS and eating STRICTLY gluten-free, my MS has been benign. Not sure if the pill would stop the route gluten takes in disease process when it isn't typical.

 
michelle

said this on
05 Jun 2013 8:22:18 AM PST
Same thing happened to me, Sandy. I get funny looks when I tell people a gluten-free diet eliminated my MS symptoms. I think they think I'm nuts!

 
dappy
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 7:32:21 AM PST
No one has mentioned the fact that gluten-free products have become a very profitable industry. What effect will this have on the progress of such a pill if any? What other set of consumers pay so high an individual price for such small quantities of products??

 
Debbie
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 8:14:09 AM PST
"DUH"! I would LOVE to take this pill and start to live my life again! I have a glimmer of hope after reading this article.

 
Luann
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 8:35:26 AM PST
I would give ANYTHING to be able to eat what I want and quit reading stupid labels!! 25 years of gluten-free is enough for me! I would take it in a heartbeat!

 
Craig
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 9:26:42 AM PST
Why is our Rx pill dependent world so eager to solve a problem that already has a solution? Stop eating gluten and exercise will power, educate yourself and others, and show determination to control what you put in your face. I'm a 17 year diagnosed celiac and love the new world that I have been involved in and this is not a breakthrough it's another mistake in modern medicine. Spend the research in helping the FDA and others to change the way food allergens are labeled and manufactured to advance our society.

 
Alex
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 10:46:16 AM PST
I'd go for it, but not to be able to eat a whole loaf of bread, but only to get rid of traces of gluten found in cross contaminated food. I'll keep going on with the gluten-free diet until they'll find something which will eliminate the risk completely. However, I'd use such a pill to eat in restaurants without worrying that staff don't really care in the kitchen.

 
Mary Beaudoin
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 10:48:29 AM PST
Yes I would take the pill. I grew up with lots of homemade pasta and I really miss it. I have not been able to find acceptable gluten-free pasta.

 
Brenda
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 10:58:56 AM PST
I would consider it when eating out. But I would still maintain a gluten-free kitchen at home.

 
Wendy
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 10:59:09 AM PST
I sincerely doubt I would go back to eating gluten all the time - too sick for too long to be comfortable with that. But... IF it works... maybe something as a treat now and again. There are things that just CAN'T be made gluten-free!

 
Carla
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 11:44:52 AM PST
I echo the sentiments of many above. I would still eat a gluten-free diet, but it would help immensely when going out with family and friends. It would be great to share meals with others in social situations.

 
Gwen Kittel
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 12:19:42 PM PST
Over the 7 years I have lived with celiac disease, I have become more sensitive to trace amounts of gluten. I used to be able to tolerate certified gluten-free oats, but now I cannot. So I don't think the pill would work for me, 95% is good, but I cannot tolerate tiny ppm of gluten, then I would still become ill. But I like the idea, if they can create an enzyme that could eliminate the anti-body reaction, that would give me more flexibility when eating out and eating food in environments I cannot control. So if the pill can handle 99.999999999% I MIGHT take it on rare occasions.

 
jill sacherman
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 12:57:49 PM PST
Great article again. Thanks for bringing us the latest, Jefferson. And would I take it? Heck, yeah... to protect us when we have an accidental glutenings, like when: my sister forgot the cookies she made "just for you" needed to have gluten free oats instead of regular oats, when we want to go to a restaurant that thinks they can serve us safely and doesn't have all the necessary cross contamination habits, quite and a big bottle of Maggi seasoning hanging off the back of the stove. Or more often, when the restaurant just refuses to even try the protocol to make us a simple dish, to use a clean pan, a clean cooking spoon and instead tells us that they are charging us an "uncorking" fee of $15.00 because we brought in our own food, which we now are forced to eat. (That just happened to me.) I'd much rather take that pill, once it becomes proven safe and effective of course!

 
peter
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 1:29:57 PM PST
No I would never take a big pharma product such as this. First of all if you are a true celiac then you can tolerate absolutely no gluten and they know this, it is a well know fact. Reducing the damage by taking such a pill is a myth, don't be fooled. Gluten is an understandable protein for everyone not just a celiac, it just does not cause as much damage in a the majority of people, but it does cause damage none the less.

 
Patricia Bell
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 1:40:23 PM PST
It would be great to be able to eat that way. I'm so sick of feeling bloated all the time. Plus I'm on limited income and can't currently afford a lot of the gluten-free foods!

 
Carol Wells
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 4:32:35 PM PST
I would take the pill and still try to avoid most gluten. For me it would be a matter of helping with cross-contamination, but I would run out and start eating wheat bread again.

 
Linda H.
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 4:40:20 PM PST
My 11 year old granddaughter has celiac disease. I would love for her to be able to go out with family and friends to a restaurant or party and enjoy eating whatever she'd like. However, I am skeptical about having her take a pill on a daily basis before it has been tested for many years. I feel that a pill of this sort will be a blessing for those suffering with celiac disease; however, I think further testing needs to be completed before being prescribed on a daily basis.

 
joanna
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 4:47:18 PM PST
First, what would be the side effects, and second, I would like to know what else could happen to your body taking this pill. It would be great knowing that I could go out with my family and on vacations not to worry about what I ate.

 
sandra
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 4:51:35 PM PST
I will never go back to eating gluten.. 5% still has a problem!!!!! And it states an acidic environment but what about people who follow an alternative way of life and do not have the acidic intestinal lining? Many work at keeping their bodies on the alkaline side and not wanting to be acidic...
Too many people who do not have celiac disease, including medical professionals will NOT feed their family gluten because wheat has been so genetically modified.... for that reason alone we should not think of wheat as the " staff of life" as it was a hundred years ago...

 
Pat
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 7:00:33 PM PST
I would definitely take it when I am eating out. This would really make me happy. I hate having to skip most of my favorite foods when I go out.

 
William
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said this on
21 Jan 2013 9:42:30 PM PST
It's foolish for them to think they can make this safe. They will never get to 100% - And I have a hard time believing they could even achieve 95%. What happens if you eat a small amount of bread, and wash it down with a beer? That bread and beer will be making its way out of your stomach much too quickly to break down even a minority of the peptides before they hit your intestines. If you've been on a long term strict gluten-free diet, eating even a small amount will jack your anti-gliadin count up, which will just cause a worse reaction the next time you eat it, and the next. - Snake oil in a RX bottle

 
Greg
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 2:09:35 AM PST
I've learned to hate gluten with such a passion. I don't think I could change back to being a gluten lover after so much suffering I went through before the idiot doctors gave me a diagnosis.

 
Cindy
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 8:36:39 AM PST
I would take the pill when I was out with friends. Otherwise, I would stay gluten-free. I don't mind not eating gluten. But when I go out that's a different story.

 
Julie
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 9:07:38 AM PST
When you say "soon," how soon do you mean? I would absolutely take it as long as it protects the small intestine from the damage gluten causes! Someone said it's available in Europe? Have celiacs in Europe who have been on it had endoscopies to see if their small intestine is still okay?

 
Sharon
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 10:09:00 AM PST
Details about timing and eating would be good. I would still not knowingly eat gluten if possible. But twice recently I went to functions where I asked ahead of time about the menu, but when I got there the meat had gravy on it. I would have ate before or brought food had I known. With this pill, maybe scraping off as much gravy as possible, then eating the meat would be an option. Also salad dressings at events where the dressing is already on the salad and no "naked" salad is available.

 
Karen
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said this on
22 Jan 2013 1:59:26 PM PST
Wonder if this will work for dermatitis herpetiformis form of celiac disease. If so, I am all in. My brother has the intestinal form of celiac disease and I have the rash....

 
Jamey
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said this on
23 Jan 2013 1:18:19 PM PST
Are we allowed to swear out of exuberance? Okay then. Heck yeah! This would be AWESOME!!!

 
Denise
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said this on
24 Jan 2013 11:44:38 AM PST
I sure would! The first thing I would eat is BREAD! With butter.

 
Roberta
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said this on
07 Feb 2013 11:49:44 AM PST
I'm so glad this may become a reality. I just hope it'll be available in my lifetime! And yes, I would definitely take it!!! :)

 
Daniel
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said this on
08 Apr 2013 11:24:25 AM PST
I have a horrible physical disability, acronym "MERRF" and dining out and cultural travel was my coping mechanism. Then I was diagnosed with celiac disease. I am desperate. If I didn't have MERRF, I would be the best gluten-free chef around!

 
John

said this on
03 Jun 2013 5:28:39 AM PST
Absolutely I would take it. As a diabetic as well, my diet is a total misery if I am strict all the time and, if I am not...

 
Dick
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said this on
30 Sep 2013 2:20:08 AM PST
While genetically modified organisms are a major concern, the article does not say whether there are any involved in the production of the engineered enzyme. Surely an enzyme can be engineered chemically to have different properties, and the source reference is an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. I looked at the abstract of that article and saw no reference to genetic engineering. It would be interesting to have this clarified.

If it gets through safety and effectiveness testing, I'd probably eventually take it, at least while traveling, but I wouldn't be an early adopter. My guess is that it will be a decade or more before it proves out, if it ever does.

 
Jjon
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said this on
02 Apr 2014 12:27:28 PM PST
I'm not really sensitive to gluten, but my sister is, and so I probably have some reaction to it that I don't realize (and I have autoimmune issues so I'm sure the gluten- leaky gut thing is implicated/doesn't help). So I want to help protect myself from it's effects since the info out there has convinced me we all suffer ill effects from it. I would take this pill to help digest gluten in eg., oats, kamut, rye, heritage wheats, hidden gluten, and the occasional restaurant bread/pasta meal. In other words, it would help me maintain a "gluten-reduced" diet, which has got to be at least a bit healthier and give your gut a break and a chance to heal. Since i don't get visible symptoms, it's hard to stay motivated to be gluten FREE. So this would help me go part of the way there at least, without feeling too deprived.

One thing about MindLinx - it looked so promising to me but then I read a thorough description of it and it SOUNDS like it doesn't actually help you digest the gluten. It is a probiotic product, w/ specific strains of organisms, that help breakdown the exorphins (opiate-like molecules) that are released from the gut when exposed to gluten, and travel to brain and cause things like ADHD and autism. So I don't think it actually helps digest the protein, it just counteracts the negative brain effects of one of gluten digestion's end-products. That does sound like it might be a good protection to have, I might try MindLinx, but I'm also going to look into glutazmine, etc to find something that actually has a "glutein-ase" in it.

RE: the enzyme being GMO, from what I remember of my college biology, I don't think enzymes have DNA, so how could they be genetically modified? Enzymes are just a long complex molecule, right? I'm ok w tinkering w an enzyme, maybe it just changes the molecule's binding sites, say, so it is more binding to gluten. It already in its natural state binds 75%, maybe they just bent it slightly or removed a couple bonds at the ends of the molecule so it does more of what it naturally does. To me that's simple, and not scary like GMO (as long as they're not using solvents, etc.)

 
Jerry Cole
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said this on
14 Jun 2014 10:40:42 PM PST
I have been diagnosed with celiac disease for the last 2 years. For a person that loves craft beers and good Italian pastas with good breads, I would love to be able to eat these foods again like normal people. I shire hope this medication works. I will be standing in line to purchase the pill. can't be any more expensive than buying gluten free food at the store. Kudos if this pill works.

 
Sana
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said this on
09 Dec 2014 10:36:23 AM PST
"safely" and "without damage" ....these are HUGE assumptions.! No I would not be likely to try it anytime soon. The GF diet is healthy!




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