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Celiac Disease Patients Have Higher Rates of Irritable Bowel-like Symptoms
http://www.celiac.com/articles/23185/1/Celiac-Disease-Patients-Have-Higher-Rates-of-Irritable-Bowel-like-Symptoms/Page1.html
Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

 
By Jefferson Adams
Published on 02/25/2013
 

Patients with celiac disease often report symptoms compatible with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, there haven't been any systematic studies regarding how adherence to a gluten-free diet might affect rates of irritable bowel syndrome-type symptoms in patients with celiac disease.


Celiac.com 02/25/2013 - Patients with celiac disease often report symptoms compatible with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, there haven't been any systematic studies regarding how adherence to a gluten-free diet might affect rates of irritable bowel syndrome-type symptoms in patients with celiac disease.

Photo: CC--mag3737To better answer that question, a research team conducted a meta-analysis of celiac disease patients to determine rates of irritable bowel syndrome-type symptoms, and how those symptoms relate to a gluten-free diet.

The research team included A. Sainsbury, D.S. Sanders, and A.C. Ford, of the Leeds Gastroenterology Institute at St James's University Hospital in Leeds, United Kingdom.

For their analysis, the team searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and EMBASE Classic to identify cross-sectional surveys or case-control studies reporting prevalence of IBS-type symptoms in adult patients (≥16 years old) with established celiac disease.

The team used case or control status and adherence to a gluten-free diet to determine the number of individuals with IBS symptoms.

The team analyzed data from 7 studies with 3383 participants.
They then calculated pooled prevalence and odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

They found that pooled prevalence of IBS-type symptoms in all patients with celiac disease was 38.0% (95% CI, 27.0%-50.0%).

People with celiac disease had higher pooled odds ratios for IBS-type symptoms than did control subjects (5.60; 95% CI, 3.23-9.70).

In patients who did not follow a strict gluten-free diet, the pooled odds ratios for IBS-type symptoms, compared with those who were strictly adherent, was 2.69 (95% CI, 0.75-9.56).

Patients who did not adhere to the gluten-free diet had higher odds ratios for IBS-type symptoms compared with controls (12.42; 95% CI, 6.84-11.75).

Such patients also had higher odds ratios compared with that observed for celiac disease patients who followed a strict gluten-free diet or controls (4.28; 95% CI, 1.56-11.75).

The results show that patients with celiac disease suffer IBS-type symptoms more frequently than control subjects, and that following a strict gluten-free diet might help to reduce those symptoms.

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