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Hepatitis B Vaccine and Boosters Less Effective in People With Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/23231/1/Hepatitis-B-Vaccine-and-Boosters-Less-Effective-in-People-With-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

 
By Jefferson Adams
Published on 04/3/2013
 

A team of researchers recently took a look at how well the hepatitis B vaccine protected people with celiac disease over time, and how well they responded to a vaccine booster.


A team of researchers recently took a look at how well the hepatitis B vaccine protected people with celiac disease over time. Specifically, they evaluated what is called long-term antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiac patients vaccinated as adolescents.

In this photo, hepatitis B attacks cells. Photo: CC--ajc1The research team included F. Zingone, F. Morisco, A. Zanetti, L. Romanò, G. Portella, P. Capone, P. Andreozzi, R. Tortora, and C.Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine of Federico II University of Naples in Italy.

They set out to investigate the anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiacs vaccinated as adolescents, along with the effects of a booster administration in non-protected individuals.

They found that, eleven years after receiving the initial vaccine dose, the percentage of vaccinees with blood levels ≥ 10 mIU/ml and antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were lower among celiac patients than among control subjects (68.6% vs 91.7%, p

Patients with anti-HBs below 10 mIU/ml received a booster dose and were retested after two weeks to measure response levels.

Post-booster anti-HBs levels were still

The study shows that, compared with healthy control subjects, people with celiac disease have lower seroprotective levels of anti-HBs eleven years after main vaccination, in addition to having a substantially lower response rate to a booster dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.

Do you have celiac disease? Have you had a hepatitis B vaccine? Have you had trouble getting proper immunity levels with the hepatitis B vaccine? Is this news to you? Share your comments below.

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