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Antireticulin Antibodies Obsolete as Test for Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/23250/1/Antireticulin-Antibodies-Obsolete-as-Test-for-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

 
By Jefferson Adams
Published on 04/22/2013
 

A recent study of celiac screening methods shows that testing for antireticulin antibodies (ARA) in patients with celiac disease is obsolete. 


Celiac.com 04/22/2013 - A recent study of celiac screening methods shows that testing for antireticulin antibodies (ARA) in patients with celiac disease is obsolete. The study includes a review of the medical literature, and recommendations for improved celiac blood screening.

Photo: CC--aurostar739Researchers S. L. Nandiwada, and A. E. Tebo are affiliated with the Department of Pathology of the University of Utah, and ARUP Laboratories in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Citing advances in celiac disease-specific serologic testing, Nandiwada and Tebo are calling for the elimination of ARA as a test for diagnosing celiac disease.

People with celiac disease nearly always carry HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 haplotypes, suffer from any of a range of diverse clinical presentations, including gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

Celiac disease patients typically produce several autoantibodies, of which endomysial, tissue transglutaminase, and deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies are considered specific indicators of celiac disease.

Although antireticulin antibodies (ARA) have traditionally been used to screen for celiac disease, these tests do not provide the best sensitivities and specificities for celiac screening.

This review highlights recent advances in celiac-specific blood testing and supports the elimination of ARA from celiac disease screening and diagnosis.

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