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Vitamin Deficiencies and Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 08/19/2014 - It is common for many people with celiac disease to have vitamin deficiencies. Eating a wide variety of foods such as meat, fish, eggs and vegetables can assist in with fixing those deficiencies. Children need vitamins to promote growth, development and good immune health. As adults we need them to prevent disease and stay healthy.

Photo: CC--Steven DepoloFirst, including small amounts of free-range, grass-fed beef in the diet will help you recover from iron deficiency. Fresh fish may help lower cholesterol, as it contains healthy omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D. Egg whites from free range hens are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Eating a balanced diet is the best way to receive the daily allowance of vitamins, rather than taking supplements, although many celiacs will also need to take supplements for some time to fully recover.

Next, vegetables supply vitamins and minerals, contain no cholesterol, and are low in calories. Vegetables that are colorful are very important in the daily diet. Bell peppers, broccoli and string beans are good sources of vitamin A. Fresh dark green leafy vegetables like kale are a strong source of folic acid, which assist in red blood cell formation. Spinach is full of vitamin D, Iron and Calcium. Vegetables are also high in complex carbohydrates and fiber. Try Romaine and dark leafy green lettuce for salads, as they will have more nutrients than Iceberg lettuce, which has a high amount of water and sodium.

Last, what are some of the best methods for cooking food to keep the most vitamins and nutrients in them? Steaming vegetables can retain the majority of nutrients, while boiling them can overcook them and cause a loss of vitamins. Try to cook vegetables, poultry and fish without extra fat by steaming them over low sodium broth, instead of water. Another healthy alternative is to stir fry vegetables. Since stir fry uses a small amount of oil, it is a fast and low-fat method to cook meals. The best part about cooking with the stir fry method is that food will retain vitamins and flavor better, since it is a fast healthy alternative.
Always talk with a doctor about dietary needs before making changes to your diet, and have your doctor test you for celiac disease before going on a gluten-free diet.

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5 Responses:

 
namklak
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
25 Aug 2014 12:57:46 PM PST
How about just tell which vitamins and minerals I am deficient? Is it just fat-soluble vits? And what is the list of fan soluble vits?

 
Shar

said this on
25 Aug 2014 5:52:11 PM PST
I have severe restless legs, and read that 34% of celiacs do. My grandmother had foot and leg problems and used to get B vitamin shots as she could not absorb some vitamins. I started getting B vitamin and magnesieum shots and it helped my restless legs a lot. I was able to take a lower dose of my restless leg RX. Walking several miles also helps my legs, but sometimes hard to find the time.

 
Olivia
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said this on
10 Sep 2014 12:53:05 PM PST
So happy with this article! I started a GF bakery few years ago because of several celiacs in my family. Also Hashimoto, restless legs, burn out are an issue in our family. High quality food supplements did help several members of my family (me, my mom, my hubby) so I started distributing them myself. For me it's the perfect joint venture: gluten free bakery (nutrition) and food supplements (nutrition again). But lot of my clients don't see a link between auto immune diseases and nutrition. That's why I'm happy to read this article!

 
linda
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
03 Oct 2014 9:59:37 PM PST
My daughter has low ferritin and has restless leg syndrome.

 
Angela Dailey
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
04 Oct 2014 8:15:20 AM PST
Spinach is NOT "full of vitamin D". While it is a good source of many things, vitamin D is not one of them. This article is (besides this misinformation) vague and poorly sourced.




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