No popular authors found.

Categories

No categories found.


Join Celiac.com's forum / message board and get your questions answered! Our forum has nearly 1 MILLION POSTS, and over 62,000 MEMBERS just waiting to help you with any questions about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. We'll see you there!






Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Six Ways Celiac Disease Can Kill You

Celiac.com 08/13/2014 - Even though some folks suffering from symptoms of celiac disease will claim they would welcome death, most people will not actually die from the immediate symptoms of celiac disease; no matter how bad those symptoms get.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons--NabokovHowever, left untreated, celiac disease can lead to numerous other conditions, several of which are potentially fatal. Remember, many people experience few, or no classic symptoms of celiac disease. These folks may find it easy to keep eating gluten with relatively few noticeable consequences; at least for a time.

So, for people with celiac disease who ignore either their doctors, or their bodies, the risks can be huge. They can even lead to death by one of the following:

1) Cancer—Nobody wants cancer, and especially nobody wants the type of cancer that can strike people with gut damage that comes with long-untreated celiac disease.

People with untreated celiac disease are at risk of developing any number of associated conditions, including gastrointestinal cancer at rates of 40 to 100 times those of the general population. Chief among these types of cancer are a type known as Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma (EATL). EATL is a gut cancer that often ends in death. People with celiac disease also need to watch out for non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

2) Thyroid Disease - There is a 2.5-fold increased risk of papillary cancer of thyroid for celiac patients.

The good news is that papillary cancer of the thyroid has a high cure rate, with 10-year survival rates estimated at 80% to 90% for any given patient. Still, the dark side is that 10-20% of patients with papillary cancer of the thyroid don’t survive.

3) Epilepsy - Rare form of celiac disease.

Patients with an autoimmune disease faced a nearly four-fold higher risk for epilepsy. In some cases, people with epilepsy can suffer from sudden unexpected death (SUDEP).

SUDEP are still poorly understood, it is possibly the most common cause of death as a result of complications from epilepsy, accounting for between 7.5 to 17% of all epilepsy related deaths and 50% of all deaths in refractory epilepsy.

4) Heart Failure - Celiac disease doubles the risk of coronary artery disease, which can, in many cases prove fatal.

5) Diabetes - Diabetes can cause numerous complications, some of which can be fatal. People with celiac disease have higher rates of diabetes than people without celiac disease. Moreover, long-term celiac disease increases death rates in people with diabetes.

There is also some evidence that a gluten-free diet can lower rates of Type 1 diabetes.

In the end, for people with T1D, having a celiac disease diagnosis for at least 15 years was associated with a 2.80 times greater risk of death

6) Obesity - Recent studies suggest that people with celiac disease are likely to be overweight or obese at the time of presentation.

Studies show that nearly 40% of people diagnosed with celiac disease are actually overweight, not underweight. Also, a full 30% of celiac disease patients are obese at the time of their diagnosis.

Of course, long term obesity can increase the likelihood of fatality in numerous categories. People treating celiac disease with a gluten-free diet are more likely to have a healthier weight. 

So, while celiac disease won't kill anyone in the short term, it can have devastating consequences if it remains untreated for a long period of time. Share your thoughts on these ways to die from untreated celiac disease, or add additional insights in the comments section.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).



Related Articles




Spread The Word





42 Responses:

 
Heidi
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
13 Aug 2014 2:03:39 PM PST
It would be nice to include some positive info instead of scaring everyone with photos of caskets. I am all for being informed but this makes it sound as if it's a death sentence. Please provide info on what you can do to prevent and reduce your chances of these diseases instead of making it sound like we are all doomed. The caskets were a horrible visual. I am going to continue liking this page but if this happens again, I am going to get my information from an honest, but more uplifting source.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
15 Aug 2014 3:25:57 PM PST
The article is titled "Six Ways Celiac Disease Can Kill You," thus you probably should not have clicked on it if you wanted an uplifting article.

 
Petrea Reading
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 11:57:48 AM PST
The title was specific enough. The picture of caskets was a cheap shot to get attention. We all die sooner or later especially as we age as well. Pointing out how celiac CAN lead to diseases and effect which can lead to death is one thing. Sensationalizing with "caskets"or death heads is simply pompous! Also there is no real way to determine the actual amount of difference one would have lived if such and such...etc!

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
21 Aug 2014 1:51:41 PM PST
Thanks, Petrea, for your comment. I agree that the chosen photo is a bit overly dramatic. I had scant time to source a photo, and took the easy way out on this one. It's definitely not the only option. I'll keep that in mind going forward.

 
Sally Baker
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 May 2016 12:33:58 AM PST
And yet it's still there.

 
Patti
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
09 Sep 2014 5:44:16 AM PST
Thank you and I agree...as a celiac patient, a nurse and also a multi-focal papillary/follicular thyroid cancer survivor, I appreciate when articles touch on the severity of the disease. I hear perceptions that CD causes, bloating, GI upset, etc. It is an autoimmune disease and the severity is often misunderstood as a disease of "food intolerance" or really just an annoying condition to those around us. I am gluten free for 6 years, post thyroid cancer/treatment for 2 years, and still I battle iron anemia an malabsorption of nutrients. Quite possibly a lifelong battle of irreparable damage.

 
Realtruth Please
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
21 Jun 2015 8:50:21 AM PST
I think a lot of people are in denial about the severity of celiac disease. Wake up calls are needed.
I've watched two people slowly die from diarrhea and the results of having intestines that are no longer able to process food. They eventually can't even absorb water. Their veins become too small to get needles in them, and they die very slowly and miserably. This is not a scare tactic, this is a reality. These two people knew they had celiac disease, but did not take it seriously, nor did their doctors or families. So I was left at their side watching them slowly waste away, cleaning up poop, knowing that they could easily be saved, but no one will listen and I have to watch them die. Please, publish more real life stories of people dying from celiac disease. It's not just the autoimmune diseases associated with it that kill people, the disease itself will kill them.

 
Cassie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
09 May 2015 3:16:44 AM PST
I had that same thought. I clicked on this article to find out what makes celiac disease fatal because I have it and haven't been sticking to a gluten free diet. This article is exactly what I needed to read. My friends and family just don't understand how important it is that I stay gluten free. I was even in the hospital for six days in January for blood clots in which celiac disease is a factor for them as well, which I guess can also be fatal. Thank you for this article, it really opened my eyes.

 
Liz
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Oct 2015 6:56:56 PM PST
Thanks for the wake-up call. My mind sometimes lies to me, telling me it's ok. This past couple months I've been eating a lot of gluten, especially pizza (my favorite binge food). I have been experiencing problems I've not had previously. I need to get it together.

 
Mary Pratt
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Jul 2016 9:31:46 AM PST
I love it, someone is always ready to argue about something...they have nothing better to do with their time. Anyways the important thing is the article is great and very helpful, thank you.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
16 Aug 2014 10:41:16 AM PST
The first paragraph makes clear that "most people will not actually die from the immediate symptoms of celiac disease; no matter how bad those symptoms get." The rest is simply fact based reality. Untreated celiac disease can lead to potentially fatal complications down the road. Sorry if that was a bit much for your sensitivity setting.

 
Amy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 8:40:19 AM PST
You always have such good information! I have both the DQ2 and the DQ8 gene markers. My mother has finally gone gluten free, and I always wondered where the other one on my dad's side of the family came from. This information points straight to my paternal grandmother. Wow! Another point, I know most people at diagnosis are overweight, but I was not. I was dangerously close to death from being malnourished due to my undiagnosed celiac. There are a lot of people that die from "failure to thrive" due to undiagnosed celiac.

 
Amy, An Allergic Foodie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
20 Aug 2014 3:35:00 PM PST
Amy, I have the DQ 2 and DQ 8 gene markers and I'm also named Amy. My dad had epileptic episodes late in life and died of heart problems. My brother has diabetes. I also have other autoimmune issues. My youngest son has celiac disease. Still, no one in my extended family believes that celiac is genetic!

 
Patti

said this on
09 Sep 2014 5:49:47 AM PST
Amy,
I can relate to your strong family history and yet the denial remains! I too have te DQ2 and DQ8 markers, my children are positive as well and yet none of my sisters have been tested. Instead my eldest sister reassures me that she only buys whole grain organic flour. Oh good! Very good quality poison. I am a nurse and just resign to allow those members to have the knowledge and make informed autonomous decisions.

 
Ruth

said this on
22 Aug 2014 8:46:36 AM PST
Like you, I was not overweight when diagnosed with celiac disease, but I had become so ill by the time I was diagnosed I almost wished I would die. I was so undernourished I believe I could have eventually died of malnutrition.

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
01 Sep 2015 12:00:06 PM PST
I, too, was way underweight. Down almost to 100 lbs at 63 years of age. Had celiac disease my whole adult life, but always treated for individual health issues. I was getting weaker, and expected to hear I already had cancer, but my doctor said it hadn't turned to cancer YET. I'm in Stage 4 of celiac disease. I immediately went 100% gluten free. I'm up 35 lbs. in a year. Stunned, but realize, celiac disease damage is irreversible, but stoppable. Keep researching, read labels, and download the gluten free app on your iPhone to scan labels in the market before you buy. Feeling Grateful everyday!

 
tammy garrett
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Jan 2016 6:39:24 AM PST
My mother and I both have celiac...I self diagnosed in early 2009, she was diagnosed in Oct 2009 after numerous endoscopes and colonoscopies we were never under weight, always over weight she has so many issue today, I cannot even begin to describe them. Our family has no idea, my husband is only first beginning to understand. Gluten free has been the best option for me. I still have issues, but try to be as educated as I can be...wish I was more normal!!

 
Peggy Cook
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
06 Feb 2016 3:59:44 AM PST
I just wanted to respond to something you said.
You said gluten free is the best option for you. People with celiac disease there is no other option. Gluten free is the only option. I personally believe everyone needs to be gluten free as gluten causes so many problems. If people care about their health they would keep gluten out of their diet before it hurts them too.
Take care of yourself and please don't wait like I have. I am tired of being sick and hope it's not to late for me. I am taking a drastic change because I do not want to die or suffer anymore.

 
Luann
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 8:44:45 AM PST
I think this was an excellent article. It clearly states how important it is to follow a gluten free diet. I for one would love to not follow a GF diet and this reminds me how crucial it is.

 
Peter
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 10:50:32 AM PST
There I am in the ER having a heart attack, the head of cardiology is introducing himself to me before I head off to the Cath Lab for 3 stints. He asks do you have any other medical conditions. I share that I'm self diagnosed celiac, he responds"oh yeah, I remember that from medical school....he states.
I had not been gluten free for a number of years leading up to that day, my bad. It wasn't even on his radar.

 
Donnie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 12:57:27 PM PST
It is always a good idea to tell it like it is. Too many people cheat on a gluten-free diet, or won't eat gluten free at all, even when they have a celiac diagnosis. If they know of the many risk factors of untreated celiac, it might be a wake up call for a few of them. I had the classic symptoms of celiac disease most of my life, but was never tested for it, until 10 years ago. I didn't even know anything about celiac. But, when I found out what was wrong I went totally GF, and never cheat. I was diagnosed with Hashimotos thyroid disease, many years before my celiac diagnosis.

 
Linda
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 7:06:47 PM PST
I was more interested in the title and content than the photo. It is a good reminder for people with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten intolerance to continue avoiding gluten. The potential diseases that may result from gluten are not worth the risk.

 
Cindy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2014 8:46:29 PM PST
This was a great article! I was diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of 52 and at that time weighed 110 lbs, losing 5 lbs every week until the diagnosis was made. I also have Barretts Esophagus , had a brain tumor, and had 5 tonic clonic seizures consecutively in one day, and had thyroid disease as well. All of these maladies were later connected to celiac disease. It is important to follow the GF diet, but that does not guarantee that none of these things will happen

 
Szilvia
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
20 Aug 2014 12:49:23 PM PST
It was a good eye opener article! More education never hurts.
Fortunately, there is so many different ways to get preventative methods or products to help heal and be better even for celiac sufferers. There are so many natural herbs out there to aid prevent the constant gut inflammation and/or help to boost the immune system and the absorption ratio also.

 
Donna
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
20 Aug 2014 9:31:36 PM PST
I love the fact that the coffins are there. I am beating my head against the wall to get folks to take this serious!!! and if graphics is what it takes to get them to read and start their own research, so be it.

 
christine
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Aug 2014 4:09:13 PM PST
You left out depression and anxiety.

 
Sue Farrow
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Nov 2014 1:24:39 PM PST
I have recently been diagnosed with coeliac and continue to eat wheat because I cant stand gluten free food. I weigh 5 stone 13lbs because I have a poor appetite, all I eat is soup, bead and crackers, wheat ones of course. I was told I will die because I am continuing to eat wheat but I didn't eat wheat then I would starve as the soup contains wheat, the bread contains wheat and so do the crackers. My taste buds won't like anything else and that's all I eat. I'm scared of dying and will I die in my sleep just like that one night I don't know or when or will I be ill before my death, my consultant has not told me. Does anyone know.

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
01 Sep 2015 12:13:41 PM PST
Try Amy's brand frozen dinners, pepperoni pizza, UDI'S Millet Chia Bread. Toast it. It's not going to get any better, until you change your diet. If you don't like any gluten free breads, then eat no bread. You must be strict with yourself. Fresh fruits, veggies, grilled meats, Bushes Vegetarian baked beans are gluten free. I add lots of seasonings, and you'll find you don't like the old regular diet, because gluten free has introduced you to much tastier foods. Snicker Doodle cookies are way better than cake. Bob's Red Mill cornbread mix is better than regular we were buying. Nature Valley Almond bars are So good, betcha can't eat just one. PLZ give it an all out effort. I don't miss cakes, never did like breaded and deep-fried, and I'm healthier now. Good Luck

 
Maureen
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jan 2016 6:09:07 PM PST
You're not dying from celiac, you're dying from stupidity.

 
Madeline Vance
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Nov 2014 7:48:44 AM PST
I don't have thyroid cancer but I do have lots of thyroid nodules. How do I get rid of them and why have they developed?
Currently, I read about using cabbage leaves on the thyroid area of the neck and bound it tightly with a cotton cloth. Very unusual and in the beginning very uncomfortable.

 
Brenda
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
29 Mar 2015 7:25:03 AM PST
Thank you for your article, it was very informative. This Jan. of 2015, one of the worst day of my life. I was at a health store and all of the sudden I wasn't feeling right, I was sweating bullets and I blacked out, then came to and yelled for my husband, he pulled me outside with my wheel chair (I'm disabled), when we got outside, I blacked out again and threw up, they called 911, by the time they got there, my lips were blue and when they got me into the ambulance, they lost me, and had to do CPR on me, and got me back. Thank God the hospital was only less than a mile away. Come to find out, my Hemoglobin was so low that the doctor was shocked that I was alive, they admitted me and I had to have 3 blood transfusions. From there, many different specialists came in and I had two procedures and surgery and that's when I was diagnosed with celiac disease, colitis, & H. Pylori. They said I was very lucky to be alive. So its been almost two months since I have been diagnosed & I am learning how to eat GF, its so complicated for me, but I am following what the doctor is saying. I have never realized how serious this is. I never even heard of celiac until now. As far as family having it, no one, has it. People needs to take this seriously. I am 43 and I would like to live longer. I almost lost my life because of it and now I have to live a whole new lifestyle and I am okay with it, just its taking time to adjust to it, one day at a time. Articles like this we NEED, so people can understand the consequences that they are taking, if they don't follow the GF diet. Thank you again for your article!! God Bless.

 
Joe Denver
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
19 Jun 2015 10:02:48 AM PST
My opinion is that this article is one of the most interesting and relevant to celiac conditions.

 
Darlene
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
12 Sep 2015 12:03:14 PM PST
This freaked me out!

 
Pat
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
19 Jan 2016 8:47:17 AM PST
Suicide is the 7th way to die from celiac disease. Scary.

 
Shelly
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
19 Jan 2016 3:29:29 PM PST
The article was interesting! I was told I had celiac disease when I was 49 years old. I was down to 100 pounds. I couldn't eat anything. It has been really hard being on a gluten-free diet, because I have to be so careful. People need to understand that celiac is very serious. Last week I was told that I had fluid around my heart and I have a heart valve problem. I still have a lot of stomach problems and hurt daily. Someone needs to find something that will helps us. For me it is not a fad, it is my life style and I have to live with it for the rest of my life!!!!

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
21 Feb 2016 10:06:11 AM PST
I also became very thin down to 75 pounds, very sick, everything I ate made it worse, my hemo was down to 5.3. I was dying, starving to death, and being told I was emotionally disturbed and was starving myself. It's hereditary. I'm glad you found out you have it and can feel better now. I have found out that you can actually claim a certain amount of the money you spend on your gluten free foods on your income tax, just save your receipts. Since it is a disease that can not be medicated like, diabetes, and other diseases, you have to eat foods to control it, you can claim that on your income taxes.

 
Walter
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
27 Mar 2016 8:30:09 AM PST
Most food is gluten food. Since only grains have gluten and there is no nutritional need for grains avoiding grains makes your diet gluten free.

Of curse, frankenfood manufactures love to add wheat and other grains to their products so you will have to cook for yourself.

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
21 Feb 2016 9:54:58 AM PST
When I was finally diagnosed with Celiac I was only 75 pounds, even though I was eating more than most people could everyday, I was starving to death, because the gluten was stopping my body from absorbing any fat, vitamins, and minerals from the food I was eating. I was told that I was going to die, and no one could figure out why, I was accused of starving myself, having mental problems. My blood count was so low it was down to 5.3. I had to go to hematologist every Friday, for months, while they put an iv in allowing medicine with iron, vitamins, and other minerals to put into my blood. I was being told I was going to die from starvation. I also want you to know that I had problems with some foods as a child. The disease started to get worse in my late to early 30s. Someone I knew was spending a lot of time researching online, and found out bout celiac, which at the time was not something many people really paid attention too. I was tested, and I am now 115 pounds, feeling great, no more anemia, no more emotion, problems such as anxiety, depression, no more female monthly problems ( which were really horrible). I absorb minerals and vitamins, fat, everything I need from my food. If you are having any bad stomach problems, anemic, feeling run down, tired, depressed, or anxious all of the time, having issues with your female monthly, lost weight, gained weight, just have the test done, don't wait, please, there are many people who have died in my family from cancers, that did not know about celiac, it is hereditary. Please be tested, and please have your children tested. I am also wondering why the people who put up this website force us to give them our names and email addresses to share important information with others that we might be able to help.

 
Karen
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Mar 2016 2:29:02 PM PST
About 3 years ago, my doctor did some blood work on me. When I went back for a follow up, she said she "believes" I have celiac disease. The doctor was reading aloud the numbers to certain blood tests I had done and I asked her so what do those numbers mean, she replied she was not sure! The doctor suggested that I try a gluten free diet and see if I feel any better. I tried that for a few weeks and not only was it very hard to find gluten free foods, especially because I live in a very rural town, I also did not feel better or really did not understand celiac disease at all. Now it is three years later and I feel like death! My feet are numb, my abdomen is swollen and I am in severe pain. I suffer from chronic fatigue and I could go on and on. I can honestly say I feel like death. My appendix has ruptured, my gall bladder was removed also. I saw another doctor but he refused to do any blood work and only told me to eat a better diet! I had an endoscopy a few weeks ago and today I got a phone call from that doctor. He informed me that I have severe celiac disease and soon I will be seeing this gastroenterologist to take the proper steps to help me live with this disease. I am upset with myself for not going to another doctor sooner yet I truly did not know of celiac disease. Hopefully I will be able to sustain a "healthy" life. For all those out there who do not take this disease seriously, please do! I have waited to long and was seen by a questionable doctor and now I suffer daily. I did not view this site when the caskets were visible, however, that's just where I feel I will end up! Open your eyes everyone for celiac disease is unpredictable and painful!

 
Bailey
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 Apr 2016 8:32:21 AM PST
I'm dead thanks to this post

 
Ian Kay
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 Oct 2016 4:02:47 AM PST
No clinical evidence whatsoever or clinical evidence references. The science is complex new diagnosis techniques, long there % death rates of coeliacs vs villi of the intestine other than coeliacs. Ref royal college of physicians London conference 2006.

 
Joe
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
03 Nov 2016 5:36:37 PM PST
Regarding your GF diet and T1D claims - the study cited showed lower incidences in offspring of *mice* that were *affected by diabetes*. Not regular mice.rnAs type diabetes is an autoimmune disorder, But the thing that gets me is that T1D is an autoimmune disease, as is coeliac. So it only logically stands to reason that mice with autoimmune disorders are going to be likely to pass on many of those same markers to their offspring. Meanwhile, this article is drawing the conclusion that all people with GF diets have lower incidences of T1D, which is frankly untrue.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *: