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Pregnancy Complications More Common in Women with Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 04/27/2015 - We know that women with infertility have higher rates of celiac disease than women who are not infertile.

Photo: CC--Christy SpencerThere's been some evidence to suggest that celiac disease might have impact women's reproductive health. However, the quest for more solid answers continues.

A team of researchers recently set out to assess fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. The research team included Stephanie M. Moleski, Christina C. Lindenmeyer, J. Jon Veloski, Robin S. Miller, Cynthia L. Miller, David Kastenberg, and Anthony J. DiMarino. The team crafted a retrospective cohort study in which they analyzed information gathered from patients at a tertiary care celiac center, along with information gathered from members of two national celiac disease awareness organizations.

A group of women without celiac disease served as control subjects. Both groups answered an anonymous online survey of 43 questions about menstrual history, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes. The group included 329 women with small bowel biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and 641 control subjects. Of the 970 women included in the study, 733 (75.6%) reported that they had been pregnant at some point.

In terms of pregnancy, there was no significant difference between women with celiac disease (n=245/329, 74.5%) and controls (488/641, 76.1%; P=0.57). However, fewer women with celiac disease than controls (79.6% vs. 84.8%) reported giving birth following 1 or more pregnancies (P=0.03).

Women with celiac disease had higher rates of spontaneous abortion than did control subjects (50.6% vs. 40.6%; P=0.01). Women with celiac disease also had higher rates of premature delivery, at 23.6% compared to 15.9% among controls (P=0.02).

The average age at menarche was a bit higher in the celiac disease group, at 12.7 years, than in the control group, which came in at 12.4 years (P=0.01).

This retrospective cohort analysis examining reproductive features of women with celiac disease, found that celiac disease was associated with significant increases in spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, and later age of menarche.

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5 Responses:

 
Jen
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 Apr 2015 9:07:26 AM PST
It's not clear whether the women with celiac had been following a GF diet. In other words, were they "healthy" before becoming pregnant, or suffering from symptoms of untreated celiac disease?

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
28 Apr 2015 5:42:47 PM PST
I agree it would be helpful to know more about the gluten-free status of these women, and whether that has any impact on outcomes. I imagine women with celiac disease who follow a gluten-free diet would have similar rates of normal pregnancy as the non-celiac controls, but that's just a guess.

 
sheri
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said this on
04 May 2015 9:55:55 AM PST
I would like someone to do research on Preeclampsia and toximia, I don't know if I have celiac disease but I am sensitive to gluten. I am also dairy, soy, corn and some other foods I am allergic to. When I had my children I did not know that I was sensitive or allergic, I was just sick my whole life and got preeclampsia. I wonder if foods cause this?

 
Christine
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said this on
04 May 2015 5:33:55 PM PST
There's room for investigating if the dreaded nine-months morning sickness could also be attributed to coeliac disease, treated or otherwise. I was subsequently diagnosed with CD, so was my sister and daughter who like me also suffered from the appalling long term morning sickness; we would have been in good company with the Duchess of Cambridge, but it would've been no consolation at the time.

 
Sharon

said this on
04 May 2015 9:46:48 PM PST
I had symptoms of celiac ever since I was 9 but didn't know what it was until I was 68. I had toxemia when I was 7 months pregnant and lost that baby. The baby weighed 2 pounds. The second baby was also stillborn, they thought I could deliver it the normal way, but I couldn't, they had to do a C-section, he was 3 pounds when I was 7 months. The 3rd baby was 4 pounds at 8 months, and lived. I think all my babies were small because they weren't getting enough nourishment because of being celiac.




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