Celiac.com 06/09/2015 - The Germans are picky about their beer. They're picky about what goes into their beer. They're picky about what's even allowed to be called beer.

Photo: CC--Houston EntreeThey have been since 1487, when Albert IV, Duke of Bavaria enacted the Reinheitsgebot, which means literally "purity order," but if often called the "German Beer Purity Law" in English.

The Reinheitsgebot specified that the only ingredients that could be used in the production of beer were water, barley and hops. According to that standard, many gluten-free beers on the market today could not be sold as beer in Germany. They would be some kind of malt beverage.

The law has changed over the years, and now permits wheat, for example, but beers brewed in Germany must still meet stringent regulations, including on ingredients. But now the Germans have a plan to brew a gluten-free beer from special gluten-free barley grown in Tasmania. That means gluten-free beer drinkers in Germany will be able to enjoy a new gluten-free beer made with real barley.

The Commonwealth scientific and industrial research organization (CSIRO) and Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) have asked TAP Agrico to grow 70 hectares of their special barley variety in Tasmania for a German brewery. Managing director of TAP Agrico, David Skipper said the gluten-free barley is a niche-grain ideally suited to Tasmania's cropping zone.

Mr Skipper said the buyer was looking for between 200 and 300 tons this year, but he expected that to rise next year. No word yet on the specific brewery that will be using the gluten-free barley. Stay tuned to leaner more about this unique approach to brewing gluten-free beers.

Read more at ABC News.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).