Celiac.com 02/29/2016 - Previous studies have shown that oat proteins trigger an adverse anti-33-mer monoclonal antibody reaction that is proportional to the immune responses in terms of T-cell proliferation.

Photo: CC--Pedro ReynaAlthough there has been some research regarding the impact of these varieties on the adaptive response, researchers still don't know very much about the role of the dendritic cells. A research team recently set out to characterize different oat fractions and to study their effect on dendritic cells from celiac patients.

The research team included Isabel Comino, David Bernardo, Emmanuelle Bancel, María de Lourdes Moreno, Borja Sánchez, Francisco Barro, Tanja Šuligoj, Paul J. Ciclitira, Ángel Cebolla, Stella C. Knight, Gérard Branlard and Carolina Sousa.

They are variously affiliated with the Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; the Gastroenterology Unit, Antigen Presentation Research Group, Imperial College London & St Mark′s Hospital, Harrow, United Kingdom; the Hospital Universitario de La Princesa and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, Spain; the INRA UMR-1095, Clermont-Ferrand, France; the Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Food Science and Technology Faculty, University of Vigo-Ourense Campus, Ourense, Spain; the Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (CSIC), Córdoba, Spain; the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, Gastroenterology, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom; and the Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain.

The team first isolated protein fragments from oat grains and then analyzed them using SDS–PAGE. They then characterized several proteins in the prolamin fraction using immunological and proteomic tools, as well as Nano-LC-MS/MS. These proteins were very similar to α- and γ-gliadin, and showed reactive sequences to anti-33-mer antibody, indicating their potential for causing adverse immune reactions.

Furthermore, the team found that some of the newly identified oat peptides triggered a range of immune responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, as compared with healthy controls.

This is the first study to show that newly identified oat peptides can trigger a range of stimulatory responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, which highlights the potential of these oat peptides to trigger adverse immune responses in people with celiac disease.


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