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New Study Takes a Deep Look at US Celiac Disease Rates Over Time


A new study looks at celiac disease rates and gluten-free food consumption. Image: CC--Scott Maxwell

Celiac.com 09/26/2016 - Previous studies have indicated an increase in celiac disease rates in the United States, but these studies have been done on narrow populations, and did not produce results that are nationally representative.

Researchers recently released an new comprehensive report, called, Time Trends in the Prevalence of Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet in the US Population: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2009-2014. The research team included Hyun-seok Kim, MD, MPH; Kalpesh G. Patel, MD1; Evan Orosz, DO; Neil Kothari, MD; Michael F. Demyen, MD; Nikolaos Pyrsopoulos, MD, PhD, MBA; and Sushil K. Ahlawat, MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and the Department of Medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, a team of researchers recently examined current trends in both celiac disease rates, and gluten-free diet adherence.

Currently, far more people follow a gluten-free diet than have celiac disease. The numbers of people eating gluten-free food far outpace the levels of celiac disease diagnosis. This may be due to perceptions that the diet is healthier than a standard non-gluten-free diet.

This research teams recent surveys examine the current trends in the prevalence of celiac disease and adherence to a gluten-free diet, including people without celiac disease, using nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANESs) 2009-2014.

The study evaluated 22,278 individuals over the age of 6 who completed surveys and blood tests for celiac disease. The subjects were interviewed directly regarding their prior diagnosis of celiac disease and adherence to a gluten-free diet.

The researchers found that 106 (0.69%) individuals had a celiac disease diagnosis, and 213 (1.08%) followed a gluten-free diet but didn't have celiac disease. These results correlate to an estimated 1.76 million people with celiac disease, and 2.7 million people who follow a gluten-free diet without a diagnosis of celiac disease in the United States.

Overall, the researchers found that the prevalence of celiac disease has remained steady (0.70% in 2009-2010, 0.77% in 2011-2012, and 0.58% in 2013-2014), however, those who follow a gluten-free diet but don't have celiac disease have increased over time (0.52% in 2009-2010, 0.99% in 2011-2012, and 1.69% in 2013-2014). The researchers conclude that the two might be related, as the decrease in gluten consumption could contribute to a plateau in those who are being diagnosed with celiac disease.

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3 Responses:

 
Anita
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
27 Sep 2016 10:09:36 PM PST
Right... Because it couldn't possibly be that the majority of doctors just don't take it seriously and rarely even attempt to diagnose it until the patient has anemia (At the least..) and/or is otherwise dying.

 
Pippy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
04 Oct 2016 8:46:01 AM PST
Indeed. Over the years, ALL the docs I saw said I had too long of a list of symptoms and to pic the top three (tired, anxiety depression) and they still did nothing but check my iron which was very low and needed transfusion. 20 years later I am I got diagnosed 2 YEARS after being in ICU for four days on intubation. I do not trust any doctors any more. They proved themselves to me a long time ago. Now they say I have a rare muscle disease. Thank you for nothing medical community, you failed me and continue to get millions of others; The medical community gets an F- . What good are studies!?! Errrggg!!!

 
Elisabeth Gerritsen
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said this on
03 Oct 2016 11:05:41 PM PST
Same here: after years of having stomach and bowel pain my doctor suggested I might have celiac disease, but he did not send me for any tests to the hospital. He advised me to go on internet for further information. After months of eating gluten-free all my pains were gone. So six months later I reported to the doctor and he send me for tests to the hospital. And of course they did not find any celiac reactions. To get a positive test I had to eat gluten again for at least 3 months! No thank you, I will not do that. Too much pain. I guess there are many people like me who avoid gluten without being labeled as celiac patient. More study is needed, I guess.




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