Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Celiac Sprue Association Revises its Dietary Guidelines
http://www.celiac.com/articles/283/1/Celiac-Sprue-Association-Revises-its-Dietary-Guidelines/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 08/10/2001
 
Celiac.com 08/10/2001 - The Celiac Sprue Association, under the new leadership of Mary Schluckebi

Celiac.com 08/10/2001 - The Celiac Sprue Association, under the new leadership of Mary Schluckebier, has recently taken an important step towards eliminating the lingering confusion surrounding its position on gluten-free foods. According to Janet Rinehart, the CSAs "Basics for a Celiac Diet" guidelines have recently been revised to include the following key changes:
  • Canola oil is not mentioned (except where you might assume the connection for "general recommendations for those with a depressed immune system)."
  • Rather than stating that quinoa, amaranth and teff are not safe for the celiac diet, the document now says: "Some celiacs have demonstrated toxicity or sensitivities to the following cereals: quinoa, amaranth and teff."

Distilled vinegar, however, is still on the CSAs "Low Gluten Items to Avoid List." The CSA still maintains that distilled vinegar and alcohol are "questionable," even if there is no detectable gluten/gliadin in them, and even though the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG), Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF) and the new guidelines from the American Dietetic Association (ADA) all include them on their safe lists . The CSA urges celiacs to ascertain the source of any questionable ingredients from their manufacturers.

The CSAs new version of their "Celiac Disease Self-Management Chart for the Clinical Diet" advocates:

  • A "self-management" approach to the diet, where the first stage is to eliminate anything questionable -conservative approach. Zero gluten is the goal.
  • The second stage is to develop good methods for questioning products and controversial items/information. Then introduce new items, one at a time, at least two weeks apart.
  • The third stage is to maintain a stable diet, using as many tools as possible. There is also a sample Food Diary Chart to use when beginning the zero gluten diet to track your meal planning (be sure to include brand names for reference).

According to Janet Rinehart the CSAs new guidelines "are not incompatible with the new ADA recommendations in the later stages." Further: "We can use the CSA diet to start with, and then use the ADA recommendations and those published by GIG/CDF, depending on individual food sensitivities." She urges celiacs and support groups to quite blaming the CSA and instead work together to contribute positively to the success of all celiacs in all groups.