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Bread Machine Tips

By Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston, TX
Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group
Celiacs Helping Celiacs

Which one? Even the cheapest bread machine can make great gluten-free bread. The main factor is to choose a model that can be programmed for one rising cycle. Regal, Toastmaster (both of which have gluten-free recipes) and Zojirushi (Model V-20)are some brands that bake good gluten-free loaves. Call the Red Star Yeasts free line to ask which model numbers are currently in the marketplace: 1-800-4-CELIAC (1-800-423-5422), and ask for their free gluten-free recipe booklet.

Paddle sizes: Because gluten-free bread is heavier and harder to mix, most members seem to prefer a bread machine with a large paddle rather than a small one. Also, two paddles work fine. (With a smaller paddle, just mix all ingredients in a bowl before adding to the bread machine). Be sure to use your spatula around the edges to make sure all the ingredients mix up well.

Bucket: This determines the size of the loaf and is really a matter of personal preference. With a smaller size loaf (1 lb. or 1-½ lb.) you bake more often. Some people prefer not to freeze the bread, so this is perfect for them. Others might like a larger size. Gluten-free bread doesnt dome up in the pan like the ones made with wheat flour. Some machines make a "bread shape" loaf now.

Cycles: Gluten-free bread is usually made on the short or rapid cycle. Some machines mix only once, others twice on this setting. To get the most out of your machine, though, you should be able to stop it at the dough stage and take the dough out to use for other things.

Timer: You dont need one. Because our recipes include eggs and milk, they cant be left sitting in the machine to be made later.

From material printed in the Vancouver Chapter Celiac News, June 1999, and Calgary Celiac News, 4th Edition 2000, and from Janet Rinehart:

MORE SPECIFICALLY -- from Red Star Yeast 12/19/00 per Glenna Vance (800) 423-5422.

Bread makers Red Star has tested as creating satisfactory gluten-free bread are as follows:

THE BREAD MAN
Model # TR3000 "Dreamachine"
Model #TR2200, "Ultimate
Call toll free (800) 233- 9054 for more information as to where to acquire this in your area.

TOASTMASTER
Model # 1142, 1145, 1172X, 1183N.
Their toll-free number is (800) 947-3744.

ZOJIRUSHI, Model #V20
Call (800) 733-6270 directly.

This listing is not all-inclusive. Other brands may make satisfactory gluten-free loaves. Follow the guidelines, consult other people in your support group who bake bread, make your choice, and enjoy freshly baked bread.

I asked her about rapid rise yeast because CSA does not recommend using rapid rise yeast. Glenna, who has presented at previous CSA conferences, said that their "Quick Rise Yeast" contains only ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and sorbitan monostearate. This latter ingredient acts as an emulsifier, not glutamate. It coats the yeast cells and protects them from damage from oxygen. It also assists in re-hydration of the yeast. It contains no gluten. Sorbitan monostearate is on the GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list of the FDA, and is not considered an allergen.

NOTE: One uses less Quick Rise Yeast in breads; i.e., use ½ tsp. per cup of flour. With Dry Active Yeast (regular) use ¾ tsp. per cup of any flour.

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5 Responses:

 
SALLY
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
04 Mar 2008 6:00:42 PM PST
I just wanted to let you know that Cuisineart makes a bread machine that has a a gluten free cycle and gluten free recipes I bought at Macy's last year for $129.

 
Joyce
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
19 Aug 2010 8:54:14 AM PST
Does the Cuisineart make good gluten free bread? Is it noisy? Is there one paddle or two?

 
pat
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 Oct 2010 8:32:16 PM PST
Cuisinart doesn't really get the Gluten-free bread thing. They really over mix it a lot. I've had to take the paddle out after 2-3 minutes. One time I thought I'd let the machine go do it's thing, what a disaster!

I've made 2 of the 4 Gluten-free recipes from the Cuisinart bread maker's recipe book (came with the Cuisinart bread maker). I purchased it for $69.99 from Costco just last week. I am returning it!! The bread was pretty bad. I bake a lot!!!

I also used it to make a recipe from one of my "Gluten-free cook books". That bread was better but still not that great! The best bread I've made-and it didn't come from a bread maker machine (because it tastes more like regular bread-or as close to it as a gluten-free recipe can get), is from "Health Artisian Bread in 5 minutes".

I'm taking my bread machine back. 3 times making bread in it an getting a poor result is enough for me.

 
Deena
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said this on
23 Aug 2010 9:19:43 PM PST
I use just the regular baking cycle with 3 rise times. My bread turns out great every time. The recipe I found called for 3 eggs plus egg substitute as well as vinegar and dough enhancer. Didn't see the point of doubling up on the stuff so I cut out the egg sub and the dough enhancer and it worked out fine. Ran out of dough enhancer once and went for it anyway, same results, haven't used the dough enhancer since.

 
SuZ.InC.
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 May 2012 10:51:45 AM PST
Recipes please!? I just got a Black & Decker machine, and my first loaf turned out like a little rock. Help! I'm so tired of the expense of store bought - but I love bread!




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