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Bread Machine Tips
http://www.celiac.com/articles/287/1/Bread-Machine-Tips/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/26/1996
 
By Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston, TX Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group Celiacs Helping Celiacs W

By Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston, TX
Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group
Celiacs Helping Celiacs

Which one? Even the cheapest bread machine can make great gluten-free bread. The main factor is to choose a model that can be programmed for one rising cycle. Regal, Toastmaster (both of which have gluten-free recipes) and Zojirushi (Model V-20)are some brands that bake good gluten-free loaves. Call the Red Star Yeasts free line to ask which model numbers are currently in the marketplace: 1-800-4-CELIAC (1-800-423-5422), and ask for their free gluten-free recipe booklet.

Paddle sizes: Because gluten-free bread is heavier and harder to mix, most members seem to prefer a bread machine with a large paddle rather than a small one. Also, two paddles work fine. (With a smaller paddle, just mix all ingredients in a bowl before adding to the bread machine). Be sure to use your spatula around the edges to make sure all the ingredients mix up well.

Bucket: This determines the size of the loaf and is really a matter of personal preference. With a smaller size loaf (1 lb. or 1-½ lb.) you bake more often. Some people prefer not to freeze the bread, so this is perfect for them. Others might like a larger size. Gluten-free bread doesnt dome up in the pan like the ones made with wheat flour. Some machines make a "bread shape" loaf now.

Cycles: Gluten-free bread is usually made on the short or rapid cycle. Some machines mix only once, others twice on this setting. To get the most out of your machine, though, you should be able to stop it at the dough stage and take the dough out to use for other things.

Timer: You dont need one. Because our recipes include eggs and milk, they cant be left sitting in the machine to be made later.

From material printed in the Vancouver Chapter Celiac News, June 1999, and Calgary Celiac News, 4th Edition 2000, and from Janet Rinehart:

MORE SPECIFICALLY -- from Red Star Yeast 12/19/00 per Glenna Vance (800) 423-5422.

Bread makers Red Star has tested as creating satisfactory gluten-free bread are as follows:

THE BREAD MAN
Model # TR3000 "Dreamachine"
Model #TR2200, "Ultimate
Call toll free (800) 233- 9054 for more information as to where to acquire this in your area.

TOASTMASTER
Model # 1142, 1145, 1172X, 1183N.
Their toll-free number is (800) 947-3744.

ZOJIRUSHI, Model #V20
Call (800) 733-6270 directly.

This listing is not all-inclusive. Other brands may make satisfactory gluten-free loaves. Follow the guidelines, consult other people in your support group who bake bread, make your choice, and enjoy freshly baked bread.

I asked her about rapid rise yeast because CSA does not recommend using rapid rise yeast. Glenna, who has presented at previous CSA conferences, said that their "Quick Rise Yeast" contains only ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and sorbitan monostearate. This latter ingredient acts as an emulsifier, not glutamate. It coats the yeast cells and protects them from damage from oxygen. It also assists in re-hydration of the yeast. It contains no gluten. Sorbitan monostearate is on the GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list of the FDA, and is not considered an allergen.

NOTE: One uses less Quick Rise Yeast in breads; i.e., use ½ tsp. per cup of flour. With Dry Active Yeast (regular) use ¾ tsp. per cup of any flour.