Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Peptide Discovery Gets To The Guts Of Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/293/1/Peptide-Discovery-Gets-To-The-Guts-Of-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 01/10/2001
 
July 2000 - Chemistry In Britain Summarized by Linda Blanchard Celiac.com 01/10/2001 - The ar

July 2000 - Chemistry In Britain
Summarized by Linda Blanchard

Celiac.com 01/10/2001 - The article states that Oxford physicians and scientists did an experiment in which celiac patients who were previously on a gluten-free diet were fed a series of human-made peptides that are copies of portions of the peptide chains that are found in the gliadin portion of wheat. The hope was that by feeding those in the study overlapping partial chains, and then testing their blood for T-cells afterward, they could find which specific portion of the wheat protein set off the immune reaction in celiacs.

One single peptide did trigger the reaction. Now that it has been identified, it is hoped that some solutions to the problems caused by celiac disease may become available. Two approaches seem to involve "turning off" the reaction -- its thought that offering a megadose of the particular peptide might turn the immune reaction off. Another method would involve offering a peptide that was very similar to the offending piece of wheat protein -- but just enough different that it might "turn off" the reaction.

Another possibility is, of course, genetically modified wheat. It should be possible for scientists to develop a wheat that has a different peptide in the place of the offender, which would hopefully look, taste, and act as wheat does in normal baking without triggering celiac reactions.