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Dental Enamel Defects and Screening for Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/631/1/Dental-Enamel-Defects-and-Screening-for-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 12/18/2002
 
Acta Paediatr Suppl 1996 May;412:47-48 Martelossi S, Zanatta E, Del Santo E, Clarich P, Radovich P,

Acta Paediatr Suppl 1996 May;412:47-48

Martelossi S, Zanatta E, Del Santo E, Clarich P, Radovich P, Ventura A
Istituto di Clinica Pediatrica, Istituto per lInfanzia IRCCS Trieste, Italy.

Celiac.com 12/18/2002 - Specific dental enamel defects (DEDs) in permanent teeth are frequently observed in celiac patients. We examined the permanent teeth in 6,949 secondary school children living in Trieste (78% of 8,724 children born between 1978 and 1982). Children with DEDs were tested for serum antigliadin antibodies (AGAs) and antiendomysium antibodies (AEAs), and those positive for serum AGAs and/or AEAs underwent intestinal biopsy. Specific DEDs were observed in 52 children (0.59% of the total population examined). Serum AGAs and/or AEAs were positive in 10 cases. Nine patients underwent intestinal biopsy (one refused) and in four cases a flat mucosa was documented (one with short stature, three completely asymptomatic).

The known incidence of celiac disease in the study area was 1:1,000 before the study program and 1:670 (an increase of 44%) after it. Dental enamel inspection may be utilized for detecting undiagnosed coeliac disease in symptom-free schoolchildren. This clinical test is probably less sensitive than serum AGA screening test, but deserves some consideration because it is cheap, easy to perform and well accepted by the population.

PMID: 8783757, UI: 96377982