Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Recurrent Brief Depression in Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/727/1/Recurrent-Brief-Depression-in-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 12/19/2003
 
The Journal of Psychosomatic Research Volume 55, Issue 6, Pages 573-574 (December 2003) Celiac.co

The Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume 55, Issue 6, Pages 573-574 (December 2003)

Celiac.com 12/19/2003 - According to Italian researchers, brief but recurring bouts of depression and other mood disorders are significantly more common in those with celiac disease than those without the disorder. The researchers conducted a study that looked at 36 clinically diagnosed celiac disease patients and compared them to 144 healthy controls. The study found that those with celiac disease had "significantly elevated risks for major depressive disorders," including major depressive disorders, dysthymic disorders, adjustment disorders and panic disorders. The researchers suspect malabsorption of tryptophan, which can lead to a decrease in serotonin synthesis, as a cause for the elevated mood disorder risk. Another possible cause is the cytokines which are produced in immune reactions that may exert an effect on brain circuits related to mood regulation. More studies are necessary to determine the exact causes.