Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
New Antibody Assay Accurately Diagnoses Celiac Disease in Less than 10 Minutes
http://www.celiac.com/articles/73/1/New-Antibody-Assay-Accurately-Diagnoses-Celiac-Disease-in-Less-than-10-Minutes/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 04/12/2002
 
Lancet 2002;359:945-946. Celiac.com 04/12/2002 - According to a report published in the March

Lancet 2002;359:945-946.

Celiac.com 04/12/2002 - According to a report published in the March 16th issue of The Lancet, a new anti-transglutaminase antibody test developed by Dr. Luis Sorell and colleagues from the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology in Havana, Cuba can accurately diagnose people with celiac disease in less than 10 minutes. The assay consists of a nitrocellulose strip that is placed in serum or plasma specimens, and it detects both IgA and IgG antibodies to transglutaminase, which prevents misdiagnosis of patients who have IgA deficiency, a trait that is frequently seen in people with celiac disease. If two dots appear it indicates a positive result. To determine the assays accuracy Dr. Sorell and colleagues evaluated 50 patients with untreated celiac disease along with 40 patients who had other gastrointestinal disorders. The results showed that the assay was 100% accurate, all of the patients with diagnosed celiac disease tested positive, and all of the patients with other disorders tested negative. Ultimately the assay could be used for an inexpensive mass-screening program for celiac disease.