J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;113:1199-1203.

Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - According to a study by Italian researchers published in the June edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis is much more common in those with celiac disease. The researchers looked at 1,044 adults with untreated celiac disease at the point of their diagnoses, as well as 2,752 of their relatives, and 318 of their spouses. They also looked at the prevalence of allergies in celiacs after one year on a gluten-free diet. The subjects filled out a standardized questionnaire upon their diagnosis, and those who reported having an allergy were tested for it using a standard makeup of 20 antigens for serum specific IgE.

The researchers found that one celiac in 173 (16.6%) had at least one additional allergy, compared with 523 of their relatives (19%), and 43 of their spouses (13.5%). Patients with celiac disease were also more likely (3.8%) to have atopic dermatitis than their relatives (2.3%) or their spouses (1.3%). The amount of time that the celiac patients went undiagnosed and therefore untreated did not seem to influence the presence of allergy or atopic dermatitis. It is possible that a longer period of time on a gluten-free diet could influence the prevalence of allergy in those with celiac disease, and more research needs to be done to determine if being gluten-free longer can decrease allergies in those with celiac disease.

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