Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Atopic Dermatitis Is Common in People with Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/805/1/Atopic-Dermatitis-Is-Common-in-People-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 07/30/2004
 
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;113:1199-1203. Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - According to a study by Italian

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;113:1199-1203.

Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - According to a study by Italian researchers published in the June edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis is much more common in those with celiac disease. The researchers looked at 1,044 adults with untreated celiac disease at the point of their diagnoses, as well as 2,752 of their relatives, and 318 of their spouses. They also looked at the prevalence of allergies in celiacs after one year on a gluten-free diet. The subjects filled out a standardized questionnaire upon their diagnosis, and those who reported having an allergy were tested for it using a standard makeup of 20 antigens for serum specific IgE.

The researchers found that one celiac in 173 (16.6%) had at least one additional allergy, compared with 523 of their relatives (19%), and 43 of their spouses (13.5%). Patients with celiac disease were also more likely (3.8%) to have atopic dermatitis than their relatives (2.3%) or their spouses (1.3%). The amount of time that the celiac patients went undiagnosed and therefore untreated did not seem to influence the presence of allergy or atopic dermatitis. It is possible that a longer period of time on a gluten-free diet could influence the prevalence of allergy in those with celiac disease, and more research needs to be done to determine if being gluten-free longer can decrease allergies in those with celiac disease.