Dig Dis Sci. 2004 Apr;49(4):546-50

Celiac.com 08/27/2004 – Dr. Peter Green and colleagues at the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, conducted a study designed to determine the sensitivity of the various serological tests used to diagnose celiac disease. To do this they looked at 115 adults with biopsy-proven celiac disease who fulfilled strict criteria which included serological testing at the time of their diagnosis, and a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Out of those studied, 71% had total villous atrophy, and 29% had partial villous atrophy. Serological results indicated that only 77% of those with total and 33% of those with partial villous atrophy actually tested positive for celiac disease, and it did not matter whether the patients presented with classical or silent symptoms. All patients who were positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase had total villous atrophy. The researchers conclude:

Seronegative celiac disease occurs. Endomysial antibody positivity correlates with more severe villous atrophy and not mode of presentation of celiac disease. Serologic tests, in clinical practice, lack the sensitivity reported in the literature.

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).