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Celiac Disease Missed as Cause of Iron-Deficiency Anemia
http://www.celiac.com/articles/84/1/Celiac-Disease-Missed-as-Cause-of-Iron-Deficiency-Anemia/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 02/15/2001
 
Br J Haematol 2000;111:898-901. Celiac.com 02/15/2001 - As reported in the December issue

Br J Haematol 2000;111:898-901.

Celiac.com 02/15/2001 - As reported in the December issue of the British Journal of Haematology, Dr. D. J. Unsworth of Southmead Hospital in Bristol, UK, and colleagues examined 483 blood samples that were found to be anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dL for women, <13.5 g/dL for men). Of this group, 28 women (26 premenopausal) and 4 men tested positive for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, and were further tested for celiac disease. 25 from this group underwent endoscopic small intestinal biopsies, and 22 of them had histological changes compatible with celiac disease. Of the group of 22, twenty-one were women, and none of them had been previously tested for the possibility of celiac disease.

Results: The researchers found that by screening anemic adults for celiac disease they ended up with a detection rate of 6%, compared with 0% detection of celiac disease using EDTA blood samples from 250 non-anemic blood donors.

Conclusion: Celiac disease in menstruating women is under-investigated as a potential cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Celiac disease serology is easy, cheap and reliable, and the researchers recommend that all cases of anemia with an uncertain cause, including when the only cause is though to be menstruation, be tested for celiac disease-associated autoantibodies.