Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com - http://www.celiac.com
Brain Perfusion Abnormalities Common in Untreated Celiac Disease
http://www.celiac.com/articles/852/1/Brain-Perfusion-Abnormalities-Common-in-Untreated-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html
Scott Adams

In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease, and since then it has become an invaluable resource to people worldwide who seek information about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.

In 1998 I created The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore! which was also another Internet first—it was the first gluten-free food site to offer a shopping cart-style interface, and the ability for people to order gluten-free products manufactured by many different companies at a single Web site.

I am also co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

 
By Scott Adams
Published on 12/11/2004
 
Dig Liver Dis. 2004 Aug;36(8):513-8. Celiac.com 12/11/2004 - An Italian study was carried out to

Dig Liver Dis. 2004 Aug;36(8):513-8.

Celiac.com 12/11/2004 - An Italian study was carried out to determine the incidence of brain perfusion abnormalities in those with celiac disease, and whether gluten intake and associated autoimmune diseases may be considered risk factors in causing cerebral impairment. The researchers used brain single-photon emission computed tomography to examine the brains of 34 adult celiac patients--16 on a gluten-free diet, 18 on a gluten-containing diet, and 18 with other autoimmune diseases--and compared them to 10 age and sex-matched controls with normal jejunal mucosa. The researchers found that 24 out of the 34 in the study--a full 71%--had brain tomography abnormalities. The most significant brain abnormalities were found in the patients with untreated celiac disease (74%), and in those with associated autoimmune disease (69%). The abnormalities mainly affected the frontal region of the brain. The researchers conclude that brain perfusion seems common in celiac disease, but does not appear to be related to associated-autoimmunity, and the condition may be improved by a gluten-free diet.